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25 Jan Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (25/1/18)


Photo by Sarah Chavdaroska


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 30 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Amaya Laucirica, Montero, Albrecht La’Brooy, Fantastic Man, Rings Around Saturn, Gamirez, Deer, and this week’s best new track by Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

30. Deer – ‘On My Own (Drum Edit)’ | Uploaded: January 18th

29. Roland Tings ft. HIGH HØØPS – ‘One Hundred’ | Uploaded: December 5th | Open with SoundCloud

28. LETRAN – ‘Rider’ | Uploaded: January 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

27. Pond – ‘Fire In The Water’ | Uploaded: January 10th | Open with SoundCloud

26. Gamirez – ‘U KNXW’ | Uploaded: January 12th

25. Total Control – ‘Laughing At The System 1, Pt. 1’ | Uploaded: December 5th | Open with SoundCloud

24. Hector Gachan – ‘East – West’ | Uploaded: December 5th | Open with SoundCloud

23. Dasler – ‘Someday’ | Uploaded: November 28th | Open with SoundCloud

22. Ju Ca – ‘Wilt’ | Uploaded: December 6th | Open with SoundCloud

21. Rings Around Saturn – ‘Night Swim’ | Uploaded: December 24th

20. Shame On Us – ‘NAAM (Fantastic Man Remix)’ | Uploaded: January 23rd

19. Albrecht La’Brooy – ‘Last Light’ | Uploaded: January 23rd

18. The Citradels – ‘Pictures of Uncle Arthur’ | Uploaded: January 8th | Open with SoundCloud

17. Solo Career – ‘Let Down’ | Uploaded: December 17th | Open with SoundCloud

16. Corniglia – ‘Strange Desires’ | Uploaded: January 9th | Open with SoundCloud

15. Tim Coggins – ‘Embers’ | Uploaded: January 8th | Open with SoundCloud

14. Telete – ‘Basketball Boy’ | Uploaded: December 17th | Open with SoundCloud

13. James i.V – ‘Freda’s Jam’ | Uploaded: January 15th | Open with SoundCloud

12. Polygon Woods – ‘Royalty’ | Uploaded: November 29th | Open with SoundCloud

11. Elizaband – ‘Old Australis!’ | Uploaded: December 24th | Open with SoundCloud

10. Oscar Key Sung ft. Ah Mer ah su & HTML Flowers – ‘Fools’ | Uploaded: January 1st | Open with SoundCloud

9. Doona Waves – ‘Losing Focus’ | Uploaded: January 8th | Open with SoundCloud

8. The Plastic Fangs – ‘Kickback’ | Uploaded: December 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

7. K a r y m e – ‘Angus’ | Uploaded: January 9th | Open with SoundCloud

6. Primitive Motion – ‘Feed the Signals’ | Uploaded: January 9th | Open with SoundCloud

5. Montero – ‘Running Race’ | Uploaded: January 17th

4. Amaya Laucirica – ‘All Of Our Time’ | Uploaded: December 24th

3. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Mainland’ | Uploaded: January 22nd

2. Donny Benet – ‘Melodie’ | Uploaded: December 17th | Open with SoundCloud

1. Totally Mild – ‘Lucky Stars’ | Uploaded: December 1st | Open with SoundCloud


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21 Apr Roland Tings ‘Each Moment A Diamond’ Tour, Live at Howler (13/4/17)


Words by Matt Bladin // Photos by Sarah Chav’


Off the back of his self-titled debut in 2015, Roland Tings became a mainstay of the Australian electronic scene. Throughout 2016 he played countless gigs, peddling his unique brand of layered, rolling electro across the country before taking some time to regroup.

In late 2016 he released the first pieces of new music in over a year, with his recognisable arpeggios and percussion accompanied by a slight shift in tone and influences. New, house-ier moments in tracks like ‘Higher Ground’ and ‘Eyes Closed’ set the tone for what was to come in the critically praised EP Each Moment A Diamond. As we learned from our recent chat with Roland, this EP was a long time in the making — and perhaps even longer in securing it’s release.

 

Roland recently embarked on a massive Australian and New Zeland tour, and despite the delays in releasing new music it became clear that fans had not lost interest. Kicking off in March the tour covered Canberra, Wollongong, Perth, Hobart, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Brisbane before heading south for Wellington and Auckland. The new live show brings to the stage the two man live arrangement recently seen at St Jerome’s Laneway Festival and supporting RUFUS on their tour.

 

We were lucky enough to catch the extra Thursday show at Howler in Melbourne, only added after the Friday night performance sold out very quickly. As the Howler band room slowly started to fill, the audience found their feet to high-energy, intricate house productions by Fishing. Highlights from their recent EP Pleasure Dome — such as ‘Yuma’ and the title track ‘Pleasure Dome’ — perfectly set the pace of the evening.

 

After the support from Fishing and Venus II, there was an atmosphere of excitement and heady anticipation by the time Roland Tings took to the stage — which he capitalised on by immediately launching in to new material. Long, progressive tracks helped build tension in the room — like the distorted harps of ‘Turn Your Face To The Sun’ — and made the most of the impressive rack of synths and relays that adorned the stage.

 

Accompaniment from a live percussionist gave many tracks an added sense of weight, without overpowering the overall sound output. New numbers like ‘Hedonist’ particularly benefitted from the heightened performance value added by live drums. Its broad, reverbed-out synth lines left heaps of space for the full-bodied bass and punching kicks to cut through Howler’s sound system. Inspired by the Australian outback, the track’s sense of atmosphere made it a stand out on the recent EP and it was received as such live.

 

More upbeat new tracks like ‘Eyes Closed’ and ‘Garden Piano‘ were spread throughout favourites from Tings’ debut album, which helped to maintain a strong energy during the hour and a half set. The progression from track to track was often seamless, largely due to the extensions and reworks of key elements between each one. The live aspects of the performance helped to transition these extended versions together to create one continuous soundtrack for the night. The slow-to-start but eventually powerful ‘Slow Centre’ proved to be a highlight of these transitions, as it moves from a Bonobo-esque percussion piece into a powerful dance floor shaker. Another highlight was the unexpected move into a Roland staple; ‘Floating On a Salt Lake’. Its drawn out introduction was weaved so effortlessly into the proceeding sounds that the dramatic cut to only the bass line came as a welcome surprise.

 

Undoubtedly one of the biggest moments of the night came from recent lead single ‘Higher Ground’. The stabbing top line synths and bouncing bassline would have been more than sufficient to raise the energy in the room again, but the inclusion of the first vocals lines of the night (from local singer Nylo) gave the audience an additional element to latch onto and inevitably sing along with. A crowd singing back the words to a recently released song always creates a special moment, and through the impressive light and smoke show Howler had put on it was clear that the two piece on stage were enjoying it just as much as the audience. Bringing the set to a close was undoubtedly Roland Ting’s biggest release to date, ‘Pala’. Hearing such an often-played track live gave it a new energy that the crowd lapped up in their final dancing moments.

 


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16 Apr The Transformation From DJ to Spotify Artist – An Interview with Roland Tings


Words by Marcus Rimondini // Photos by Sarah Chav’


One of the most exciting Australian electronic artists on a continual rise at the moment is Roland Tings. Since his debut LP release back in 2015, he has played festival stages across Australia, headed overseas to play internationally and dropped a new EP Each Moment A Diamond which has received nothing but praise alongside his first release. His music brings to our Australian scene a vibrant array of colour, interesting textures and basically an overall package that is totally unique to us at the moment.

Whilst touring around Australia and New Zealand on his ‘Each Moment A Diamond’ EP – AUS & N.Z Tour’, we caught up with Roland Tings in his old suburb of Fitzroy to chat travel and tours – in particular his inclusion on the St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival 2017 line-up -, his friend and also rising artist Harvey Sutherland, his inspirations and future, and what we can look forward to from him in terms of his production and vision.

 

Marcus Rimondini: So in the past year you have spent a lot of time travelling around the US. What were some of the ups and downs of being there?

Roland Tings: Touring there is in its own world – it’s very different to touring in Australia where you fly to most of the gigs. In America it was a 30-day tour with Chrome Sparks, in a van, just driving all day and playing all night. We’d only be sleeping in shitty roadside motels for three or four hours at a time.

Did you find it difficult to perform by the time the 25th gig came around?

It’s easy in some ways, harder in others. You can get into the venue, set up your stuff and do what you have to do – but by like the 27th show in Washington D.C., after we had driven around the entire country, I was just at the end of my tether. Doing 27 supports in a row with a variety of good and bad shows, it was taxing emotionally.
But so many great things did happen on that tour! I even went out with RÜFÜS / RÜFÜS DU SOL as well and did six dates with those guys, really cool time. Touring around I enjoyed the vibes in Seattle, Portland and LA, whilst New York was quite an experience. I stayed there for about a month and a half in between tours with my friends in Greenpoint.

Why did you choose to release just an EP this time around?

It just made sense. From my perspective, my manager’s perspective and the label’s perspective it seemed right to not jump straight into an album. I’ve got so much material, the EP could’ve easily been an album; my last one was eight and ten on the vinyl, so it just felt like the right thing to do. I think for a lot of the time while I was making the EP, I was trying to work out what kind of music I wanted to make.

When I made the first record, I didn’t really know what I was trying to do. I just made a bunch of stuff quite quickly and I didn’t have a whole lot of faith in it. But everyone did seem to like it, which was really cool for me. So with this EP, it was a case of going back to the drawing board and having to think deeply about what I was trying to achieve, what kind of sounds I wanted to use and how to push the sound forward from what it was through to what it is now (which is a bit more refined with better production).

 

On your new EP ‘Each Moment A Diamond‘, is there a reason why you included ‘Hedonist’ and not ‘Eyes Closed’?

The EP was done quite a long time ago. I got really frustrated with various delays and thought ‘I just need to release something to feel like I still exist’. It’s hard to be a musician and go a whole year without releasing a single piece of music. I had ‘Eyes Closed’ sitting around, made it in winter last year, so we put that one out to stop myself from losing the plot while we waited for the EP to come together [laughs].

I did think it might be a bit confusing to not have ‘Eyes Closed’ on there, especially because the artwork is similar, but the tracks didn’t tie in… You got me [laughs]. I honestly thought about this, and I thought, you’d really have to be paying attention to notice.

How much do you think about the track order of the EP? Or now that we’re in the streaming age is that less of a big deal now?

For me, it’s really important and it’s still something that I care so much about. I want to create a body of work that flows and is a good listen from start to finish – I want people to sit down and ‘LISTEN’ to the record. I mean, I used to listen to DJ mixes almost exclusively and that was the only thing I would listen too. But since I’ve started getting into Spotify, which I had to get for Roland Tings, I really got into it and now I only listen to albums start to finish. It’s funny because the consensus is that in the streaming age fewer people do this, whereas I’ve gone the other way.

When you’re constructing a song is there anything specifically that you start with or does it vary?

It’s never the drums. It’s always something melodic and it’s also usually never a chord progression. Some kind of sequence, some interesting melodic idea, or an interesting combination of things that I’ve chopped up and rearranged. Then from that point, it’s anybody’s guess. [Momentary distraction by every one of cute dog in Edinburgh Park]

When you added a vocalist, did you look specifically for a female voice? How did that come about with Nylo?

I definitely wanted to work with a vocalist but didn’t really have any solid ideas about who that had to be –
I had a think through a bunch of different options. We hit up a whole bunch of different people, and very interesting, talented people had a go, but Nylo was the one who really stuck with me. She did a great job, we got straight into the studio and nailed it in just a few sessions and that was it. It was a fast process.

 

Who does your artwork? It’s one of the few pieces of music artwork I’ve seen recently that seems to match exactly how the music sounds [to me] – how did you come across them?

The guys who do the artwork, Tim and Ed, they’ve been my friends for ages. Previously when I was a graphic designer they were like my idols. I loved their work so much and they kill it with everything they do. I think we come from a very similar place – we’ve spent years going to the same parties, listening to the same music, going to the same exhibitions. We have the same friends, go on holidays together. Tim, Ed and Roland Tings come from the same world. When it comes time to do a record and the artwork to go with it, we have a meeting and I tell them what the record is about, what I was thinking about when I made it, and they just go and make it happen.

When they come back it’s always spot on, it’s always amazing, and they always nail it. The stuff they send back is always kind of weird, but then you look back in two years and everyone’s started doing that same thing. Their aesthetic is part of the sound. They listen to my music while they work on other stuff. Sometimes I look at their work and I think about what kind of artwork they would make for the song that I’m working on. I feel like they’re almost members of the band.

You mentioned you used to listen to post-rock? That escapism can still be felt in the new EP. Do you still listen to post-rock or have you moved on to a more modern version?

[Laughs]. Yeah, that post-rock stuff is a little dated now… Maybe. I very rarely find myself listening to electronic music these days. I mostly listen to ambient music or rock bands, you know, good old Smith Street Band or like Eddy Current.

Are you keen to explore more usage of guitars on further releases?

There’s guitar on the last record, and I’m definitely keen to explore a bit more of that when I make an album. It’s going to have a lot of guitar. [CORRECT] I really like as a great blueprint for the way that these palettes are done in post-rock, combine well with electronic music like Mount Kimbie. [CORRECT] I think they do an amazing job with those sorts of tones so that’s a huge reference for me.

Where’s the best place to listen to the new EP – the countryside?

I would say just driving through the countryside. I like listening to stuff on planes, looking out the window, and not everybody gets the chance to do that very often. I think moving vehicles, especially in the car are one of the best places to enjoy music. You can have it up as loud as you want, the physicality of the sound coming out, the changing scenery and crazy coincidences with the weather. You can’t be on your phone, so you’re more locked in.

So yeah, I think the car, unless you have a really good setup for listening at home where you don’t have your housemates coming in [laughs]. Or let’s just say ‘kick-ons’, but the more relaxed version where it’s just a few people, all the lights are off and you’re all lying on the floor of your living room with the music up really loud and the sun’s coming up.

 

How important is it when it comes to translating the songs live?

The live thing has always been a large part of it. I noticed not a lot of people doing that in Australia (playing electronic music live) when I started. I knew there were loads of people in America doing it, and always been reasonably big in Europe, but not many people were doing it here.

One of my favourite Australian groups for the longest time were Seekae. They were so cool and I went to all their shows. So it was those guys and Speed Painters that I know for me and my friend Harvey Sutherland were basically our inspiration.

Who is your live partner in crime?

Bill was the drummer for the Chrome Sparks tour – he’s played for Shlohmo, he’s based and produces in LA, he does loads of different stuff, session and live touring stuff. On the Chrome Sparks tour, I was doing lots of improvisation and Bill has existed not so much in the world of house and techno, but he was like “I love what you’re doing with your modular, we should do something”. So we went out to Joshua Tree after the tour and just jammed it out, it was sick. I was like “Dude, come to Australia and we’ll do this on the St. Jerome’s Laneway tour and make it happen”, so he did. It was a lot of hard work but we put it together and it worked!

Now I work with Julian Sudek who plays in World Champion. He’s used to playing on a live kit and an SPD, as opposed to Bill who was all MIDI-Control, so that again brings a different vibe. However I think this is the one that’s going to stick for awhile – it just really works.

How was the St. Jerome’s Laneway tour?

It was really cool. For a very long time I didn’t really feel like a part of the music industry or anything. I hadn’t felt like I was a part of a Melbourne scene at all, and I’ve never felt part of the higher level Australian music scene of people who do these big festivals and stuff like that. Splendour In The Grass last year, for my first time, I was in the artist area and there were people that I knew there, it was like “Oh hey, I met you at this festival and we had a beer” [laughs].

I feel like the Laneway tour was again was like that – I knew some people on there, I had some mates on the tour. Bill and I were doing a show that we really believed in, and people responded really well. It was wild some of the scenes in Melbourne and Sydney in particular – just hundreds of people going mental and we were basically on the stage doing completely improvised modular techno [laughs]. It felt like something very special to me.

The Laneway crew was sick as well and I had so many cool random encounters. I was talking to somebody about why do people always cry on planes, and he had an amazing and elaborate theory, and we just kept talking. Then he was like “Oh I’m in Glass Animals” and I was like “Oh cool!” because they’re like a really big band and it was cool that the tour had big bands. They were full of the people that I would just hang out with.

 

What’s some of the gear you use live on stage?

It changes drastically all the time. For example, the current tour has the full drum kit on stage with a snare drum, a tom mic’d up and running into a mixer on the stage where I’m doing delay and reverb effects on the live drums with an SPD also running into my mixer. So essentially I’m manipulating the live kit and sending back out to the front of house. Then I’m doing my usual thing of a synthesiser and effect pedals.

It’s fun to play, as opposed to the Laneway tour, where it was all modular and mostly improvised which made it very hard. It’s way more nerve racking because if you get up and don’t have anything prepared, and there are a thousand people watching you, it can create a lot of stress [laughs]. People are going to hate this if it doesn’t go well, it’s really bad when it goes bad [laughs].

I’ve used a few Roland Tings tracks in DJ sets – do you ever think about the intro and outro and how it translates to mixing like some house artists do?

Absolutely, I think it’s one of the prime things – even though I’m not really making music for DJ’s so much anymore like I used to when I started. Now I know my audience is more like people who are listening on Spotify rather than DJ’ing. It’s always got a DJ friendly intro and outro, there’s always 16 bars of something to get you in and out if you choose to DJ the songs. I don’t know why I keep doing it, it’s just how I like to make music, and when I’m making my songs I like to try and mix into another track and see what works, and what doesn’t work.

The art of the intro is actually really, really hard to get right. I don’t know why it’s so hard but it is. If you listen to some commercial dance stuff it’s literally just 16 bars of the drum bit and then it drops into the song. But getting something that builds up organically from the intro and is interesting I can find very difficult yet fun [laughs].

What’s the plan for the rest of the year?

I’ll be going back to the US in May to go on tour with Com Truise and Clark which will be sick. It’s a big tour going everywhere so that’ll be cool to eat McDonald’s with those guys every day [laughs]. Then I’ll come back and start working on an album, or whatever that looks like, I don’t really know.

Are you excited or nervous?

I’m excited and honestly can’t wait to grow this project because I already feel like I’ve advanced musically so far beyond where I started. I just can’t wait to keep it going. So many sounds I want to explore, and so many people that I want to work with – I’m looking forward to it.

 



A U S & N Z | T O U R D A T E S
Saturday 15th April – Sydney, Oxford Art Factory
Sunday 16th April – Adelaide, Fat Controller Saturday 22nd April – Brisbane, The Foundry
Friday 28th April – Auckland, REC Saturday 29th April – Wellington, Meow


 

U S | T O U R D A T E S
Monday 1st May – Santa Ana, CA @ Constellation Room Tuesday 2nd May – Santa Cruz, CA @ The Catalyst Atrium
Thursday 4th May – Portland, OR @ Holocene Friday 5th May – Vancouver, BC @ Imperial
Saturday 6th May – Seattle, WA @ Neumos Sunday 7th May, Eugene, OR @ Wow Hall
Tuesday 9th May – San Francisco, CA @ Mezzanine Wednesday 10th May – Santa Barbara, CA @ Soho Music Club
Thursday 11th May – Los Angeles, CA @ The Regent Theater Friday 12th May – San Diego, CA @ The Belly Up
Saturday 13th May – Santa Fe, NM @ Meow Wolf Sunday 14th May – Denver, CO @ Bluebird Theatre
Tuesday 16th May – St Louis, MO @ Firebird Wednesday 17th May – Nashville, TN @ Exit
Friday 19th May – Washington, DC @ U Street Music Hall Saturday 20th May – Boston, MA Together Festival; The Middle East
Sunday 21st May – Hamden, CT @ The Ballroom Tuesday 23rd May – Baltimore, MD @ Ottobar
Wednesday 24th May – Philadelphia, PA @ Coda Thursday 25th May – Brooklyn, NY @ Warsaw
Friday 26th May – Montreal, AC @ Theatre Fairmount Saturday 27th May – Toronto, ON @ Velvet Underground
Sunday 28th May – Detroit, MI @ The Shelter Tuesday 30th May – Pittsburgh, PA @ Rex Theater
Thursday 1st June – Indianapolis, IN @ The Hi-Fi Friday 2nd June – Cleveland, OH @ Grog Shop
Saturday 3rd June – Chicago, IL @ Concord Music Hall Sunday 4th June – Minneapolis, MN @ Fine Line Music Cafe
Monday 5th June – Omaha, NE @ Slowdown Tuesday 6th June – Kansas City, MO @ Record Bar
Wednesday 7th June – Dallas, TX @ Trees Thursday 8th June – Houston, TX @ White Oak Music Hall
Friday 9th June – Austin, TX @ The Mohawk Saturday 10th June – Mexico City, MX @ Sala Corona



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15 Feb REVIEW: Roland Tings ft. Nylo – ‘Higher Ground’




After the release of ‘Eyes Closed‘ a few months ago, Roland Tings has continued to drip feed music from a supposed follow up to his self titled 2015 release.

Higher Ground‘ is his first piece of music out in 2017, and continues classic elements of Roland Tings production now paired with various new sounds, most notably the inclusion of vocals from Nylo.

While many of the signature layered-rhythms and structures are still present, they are given a new dimension to work around with the inclusion of a female topline – something we’ve practically never heard before from the Melbourne producer. For the most part this new balance works well. The song never feels crowded, yet still maintains a high level of trademark bounce and energy throughout.

The vocals, when combined with newer house-ier elements, show a continued musical growth in the time off since his last album. This is always encouraging to hear, especially from an artist with such a definitive sound on a debut LP.

Hopefully more of this musical exploration is on display when he embarks on his national tour in March/April.

 


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09 Feb Ripe’s Weekend Gig Guide (9/2/17)


Photo by Sarah Chavdaroska // Visuals by Tristan Jalleh


Music venues around Melbourne house some of the best local and international acts. We’ve compiled our top five picks for gigs this week so you don’t miss out. Be a part of one of the best live music cities in the world, and check out some of our favourite artists and venues.


This Week…


Friday, 10th February

Broadway Sounds @ The Gaso

Tickets here

gg-broadway-feb-10

Starting off the weekend ~right~ on Friday, Broadway Sounds, Mildlife, Mezko and a whole host more are playing all night long.

Broadway Sounds are launching a new song and Mezko are playing for the first time in Melbourne, so head down to The Gasometer early for an open-roofed relax.


Friday, 10th February

Redspencer LP Launch

Tickets on the door

gg-redspencer-feb-10

Redspencer are launching their debut LP Perks on Friday night with support from Unity Floors, Jaala (solo) and Emma Russack.

If you can’t make it down to The Curtin never fear! Perks is available now both digitally and on 12″ vinyl.


Saturday, 11th February

Lost Weekend

Tickets Here

gg-roland-tings-feb-11

Boney‘s Saturday night staple Lost Weekend is hosting Roland Tings for his only hometown DJ set of this summer.

Tickets are available online and what’s left will be on the door, but with CC:DISCO!, Myles Mac, The Tortoise, Ryan Berkeley and more set to play support head down early if you’re going to risk it.


Saturday, 11th February

The Mercat (The End)

Tickets on the door

gg-mercat-feb-11

Speaking of heading down early, you’ll want to be waiting in line as you’re reading this for the final night of The Mercat on Saturday.

Tornado Wallace, Sleep D, Francis Inferno Orchestra, and Otologic are all lined up to play, and I’m sure there will be a few other regulars jumping up to say goodbye.


Sunday, 12th February

Bedroom Duets

~Free entry~

gg-bedroom-suck-feb-12

Sunday afternoon sees the final installment of Bedroom Duets at the MPavilion for the season.

Liz Mitchell (of Totally Mild) and Jess Ribeiro are playing stripped back solo sets, starting at 5pm. Have a peek here at the Trading Tunes Jess made for Liz earlier this week and see why we’re so excited to see these two play.

 

 

 


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22 Feb Ripe’s Australian Chart (22/2/16)

 

Ripe’s Australian Chart is updated each week with our top tracks recently uploaded by Australian artists, ranked all the way to #1. You’ll find our chart below, and a weekly playlist on the Ripe SoundCloud.

At #30 we have Melbourne’s Daniel Trakell, who is set to release a six track EP titled Paradise in April. ‘Wasted Light‘ is the first single, and if you’re a fan of Tobias Jesso Jr., you’ll dig it. Also out of Melbourne, producer Asdasfr Bawd returns at #28 with a choppy dance remix of the new James Blake track ‘Modern Soul‘. I OH YOU‘s latest signing MOSSY has released his debut single ‘Electric Chair‘ that will appear on his debut EP in May, and jumps in at #27. It’s a cross between the vocals of Oasis and the slower jams on Tame Impala‘s latest album Currents.

The Melbourne duo at Stina Tester & Cinta Masters come in at #22 with ‘Deep Sleep‘ via Listen Records. It starts off a little like ‘She’s Lost Control‘ by Joy Division, before hitting a gothic spiral of ’70s analog keyboard. It’s not exactly The Doors; more like Blondie, or today’s comparison would be Austra. At #21, Sydney’s Charles Murdoch has released ‘Open‘ featuring Chloe Kaul from the duo KLLO. This soothing tune featured on Murdoch’s recently-released debut album Point.

Jumping up to #15, we have ‘Famously Monogamous‘ by Jen Cloher from the Milk! Records family. It’s from a collective Febraury release by the label, and it moves back and forth between sounding like Yuck in the verses, and Weezer in the chorus. Next at #14 is Mio, the project of Melbourne’s Lisa Miosku. Her lo-fi cover of ‘Morning Sun‘ could be mistaken for a single recorded back in the ’40s, her gentle, feather-light sound providing more tension headache relief than paracetamol.

Sliding in at #11 is Ned Beckley aka Lower Spectrum from Perth, who just dropped the second single ‘Masquerade‘ from his upcoming New Haze EP. The track tends to bobble up and down like a ’90s movie trailer theme song – which isn’t a bad thing, because by moving himself away from the strictly dance side of electronic music, he’s quietly carving out his own niche. At #10 is Mall Grab from Newcastle, who has uploaded the third (and title) track from his upcoming four-track Sun Ra EP. If you’re a fan of deep, minimal techno like Leon Vynehall, then start following Mall Grab.

Bendigo’s Fountaineer are set to release their first album later this year, and ‘Still Life‘ finds itself at #6. If Matt Berninger (The National) covered the album Slave Ambient by The War On Drugs, it would likely sound like ‘Still Life’. A lot of my appreciation for ‘Still Life’ sits within its subtle guitar details and effective, restrained vocal delivery. Another country Victorian band, Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, continue their hot form with ‘Write Back‘ at #4. With every new R.B.C.F. tune at this point, I automatically assume it will have me shaking around in my chair, due to their endless slick guitar interplay and upbeat nature.

Brisbane band Major Leagues write dreamy garage-pop melodies as well as anyone in the country, and ‘Better Off‘ is another strong example. They make it sound effortless and that’s why ‘Better Off’ comes in at #3. The EP Dream States comes out in April, but I recommend catching them next month on their Australian tour with Alvvays, a band who impressed me at SXSW last year. Melbourne’s I’lls singer Simon Lam has a long-running solo project called Nearly Oratorio, and has nabbed the #2 spot this week. ‘Tin‘ will feature on his new EP in April and it has feels attached all over it when he sings “I’m home sick, when I’m out of you”. I loved the potential of I’lls, but I also can’t help but think that the stripped-back clarity of his own project will work even better. Nearly Oratorio has potential to be the project that makes Simon Lam a household Australian name.

At #1, Good Morning replace themselves with another track off their Glory EP called ‘Give Me Something To Do‘. You know you’re in a class of your own when you’re only competing against yourself. ‘Give Me Something To Do’ is their most versatile song to date, starting at a breezy pace with a casual saxophone before fading out, only to re-emerge with a guitar riff that gives me an excited smile every time. Damn these cheeky Melbourne buggers and their wizardry.


30. Daniel Trakell – ‘Wasted Light’

Uploaded: February 14th


29. Robert Muinos- ‘Mum’

Uploaded: January 31st | Last Week: #30


28. James Blake – ‘Modern Soul (Asdasfr Bawd remix)’

Uploaded: February 13th | Last Week: #28


27. Mossy – Electric Chair’

Uploaded: February 16th


26. River Yarra – ‘Song For Tan’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #28


25. Diet- ‘The Rip’

Uploaded: February 11th | Last Week: #27


24. Banoffee – ‘With Her (Roland Tings Remix)’

Uploaded: January 27th | Last Week: #25


23. Esese – ‘For Nuria (Lo-Fi)’

Uploaded: January 23rd | Last Week: #24


22. Stina Tester & Cinta Masters – ‘Deep Sleep’

Uploaded: February 12th


21. Charles Murdoch – ‘Open (feat. Chloe Kaul)’

Uploaded: February 15th


20. Marcus Whale – ‘My Captain’

Uploaded: February 8th | Last Week: #23


19. The Sanctuary – ‘Miss You’

Uploaded: February 3rd | Last Week: #20


18. Blake Gilray – ‘Coolabah’

Uploaded: January 25th | Last Week: #19


17. Hayden Calnin – ‘Cut Love’

Uploaded: February 9th | Last Week: #18


16. Alice Ivy – ‘Touch’ feat. Georgia Van Etten

Uploaded: January 27th | Last Week: #16


15. Jen Cloher – ‘Famously Monogamous’

Uploaded: February 14th


14. Mio – ‘Morning Sun (Dave Bixby cover)’

Uploaded: February 16th


13. Nolan House – ‘On The Wall’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #15


12. Chook Race – ‘At Your Door’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #14


11. Lower Spectrum – ‘Masquerade’

Uploaded: Febraury 19th


10. Mall Grab – ‘Sun Ra’

Uploaded: Febraury 17th


9. Hoodlem – ‘Kintsugi’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #9


8. Back Back Forward Punch – ‘Machine Believing’

Uploaded: February 4th | Last Week: #8


7. Cale Sexton – ‘Open Minded Meltdown’

Uploaded: January 26th | Last Week: #6


6. Fountaineer – ‘Still Life’

Uploaded: February 3rd


5. Ara Koufax – ‘Makers’

Uploaded: February 8th | Last Week: #3


4. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Write Back’

Uploaded: February 13th


3. Major Leagues – ‘Better Off’

Uploaded: February 10th


2. Nearly Oratorio – ‘Tin’

Uploaded: February 17th


1. Good Morning – ‘Give Me Something To Do’

Uploaded: January 27th


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16 Feb Ripe’s Australian Chart (16/2/16)

 

Ripe’s Australian Chart is back for 2016. Once again we’ll be posting an update each week on our top tracks recently uploaded by Australian artists, ranked all the way to #1. You’ll find our chart below, and a weekly playlist on the Ripe SoundCloud.

We start at #30 with ‘Baker‘ by Robert Muinos from Melbounre. ‘Baker’ is the third track on his latest EP titled You Are Alone. Robert channels the quiet sorrow of Elliot Smith with life observing lyrics you’d hear from Sun Kil Moon or Father John Misty. At #27 Diet from Melbourne are back with a follow up to their highly addictive first single ‘Your House‘. You’d likely slide ‘The Rip‘ into the surf rock genre, but it’s not the sunny surf rock kind, more the rainy and wearing a bodysuit kind.

Up in Sydney; Marcus Whale from Collarbones dropped his first official single that’s not a demo. ‘My Captain‘ finds itself at #23 with its industrial pop sounds. I can now see where Marcus Whale is trying to take his sound, and there’s definitely an interesting market for it. Back in Melbourne at #20 with the trio The Sanctuary, who pushed past that post-Flume sound with their first single ‘Miss You‘. The vocals carry a defeated and vulnerable tone that Oscar Key Sung routinely pulls off effectively.

The most moving track of the week goes to Hayden Calnin at #18 with ‘Cut Love‘. Hayden sets a very bleak landscape via Sigur Rós with Bon Iver vocals. It’s a combination I’ve heard many times before, but he sells the emotion well when he sings “cut love!”. The next producer is a little mysterious; I only know that Nolan House is based in Melbourne. At #15, ‘On The Wall‘ pops with ear-grabbing sounds that carefully get pushed and then released. It’s meticulous without sounding robotic.

We jump up to #8 with the Melbourne duo Back Back Forward Punch, whose name always reminds me BadBadNotGood. They’re back with the most addictive song of the week called ‘Machine Believing‘. It’s vintage Miami Horror with a deep house bassline. Not the most complex recipe, but good luck not wanting to dance immediately. The Vacant Smiles are next up. At #5, ‘Drenched‘ jumps out at you like early Surfer Blood or even The Strokes without the classic guitar hooks, but instead with a smooth and sneaky slow down change up one minute in. If you dig ‘Drenched’, I suggest giving the whole new album You’re Not Really Here a listen.

However the track of the week at #3 goes to Ara Koufax with ‘Makers‘. The confidence is glowing in the Melbourne duo right now. ‘Makers’ sounds like they’re just toying with us, that’s how effortless it sounds. When you feel like an artist is both teasing you and pleasing you at the time, you know the creative juices are flowing. The best part is that it’s hard to directly trace the influences behind ‘Makers’. Ara Koufax are coming into their own in 2016.

 


30. Robert Muinos- ‘Mum’

Uploaded: January 31st


29. Flume – ‘Smoke And Retribution’ feat. Vince Staples & Kučka

Uploaded: January 30th | Last Week: #25


28. River Yarra – ‘Song For Tan’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #24


27. Diet- ‘The Rip’

Uploaded: February 11th


26. Spookyland – ‘God’s Eyes’

Uploaded: January 20th | Last Week: #23


25. Banoffee – ‘With Her (Roland Tings Remix)’

Uploaded: January 27th | Last Week: #22


24. Esese – ‘For Nuria (Lo-Fi)’

Uploaded: January 23rd | Last Week: #19


23. Marcus Whale – ‘My Captain’

Uploaded: February 8th


22. Letran – ‘71221325-02’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #18


21. Smile – ‘Holiday’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #17


20. The Sanctuary – ‘Miss You’

Uploaded: February 3rd


19. Blake Gilray – ‘Coolabah’

Uploaded: January 25th | Last Week: #16


18. Hayden Calnin – ‘Cut Love’

Uploaded: February 9th


17. S M Jenkins – ‘Mikrowave’

Uploaded: January 11th | Last Week: #15


16. Alice Ivy – ‘Touch’ feat. Georgia Van Etten

Uploaded: January 27th | Last Week: #14


15. Nolan House – ‘On The Wall’

Uploaded: January 29th


14. Chook Race – ‘At Your Door’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #12


13. Mangelwurzel – ‘I.O.U.’

Uploaded: January 12th | Last Week: #11


12. The Drones – ‘To Think That I Once Loved You’

Uploaded: January 20th | Last Week: #10


11. Courtney Barnett – ‘Three Packs A Day’

Uploaded: January 11th | Last Week: #9


10. Liluzu – ‘Gunko’

Uploaded: January 19th | Last Week: #8


9. Hoodlem – ‘Kintsugi’

Uploaded: January 29th | Last Week: #7


8. Back Back Forward Punch – ‘Machine Believing’

Uploaded: February 4th


7. Le Pie – ‘Up All Night’

Uploaded: January 19th | Last Week: #6


6. Cale Sexton – ‘Open Minded Meltdown’

Uploaded: January 26th | Last Week: #5


5. The Vacant Smiles – ‘Drenched’

Uploaded: January 11th


4. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Wither With You’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #4


3. Ara Koufax – ‘Makers’

Uploaded: February 8th


2. No Zu – ‘Spirit Beat’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #3


1. Good Morning – ‘To Be Won’

Uploaded: January 21st | Last Week: #2


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charthhjh

04 Feb Ripe’s Australian Chart (4/2/16)

 

Ripe’s Australian Chart is back for 2016. Once again we’ll be posting an update each week on our top tracks recently uploaded by Australian artists, ranked all the way to #1. You’ll find our chart below, and a weekly playlist on the Ripe SoundCloud.
Flume surprised us with ‘Smoke & Retribution‘ at #25. He has Vince Staples and Perth’s own Kučka to thank for injecting new life into his upcoming second album. It’ll be interesting to see if Flume settles into a producer role for singers similar to that of Disclosure and Rustie, or if he aims to remain the focal point of his project.

At #24 River Yarra out of Melbourne is on the Solitaire record label with other favourites of ours Good Morning, I’lls and Asdasfr Bawd. He has uploaded a reflective down tempo track called ‘Song For Tan‘, which seems to be dedicated to the passing of his dog. Rest in piece, pup.

Sliding in at #15 is ‘Mikrowave‘ by S M Jenkins from Sydney’s Step-Panther. The vocals sound like Kevin Mitchell from the ’90s Australian band Jebediah, but the vibe is more in the vein of Dick Diver or The Ocean Party. This is a strong start to his solo project I’d say.

Annika Schmarsel aka Alice Ivy from Melbourne comes in at #14 with ‘Touch‘ featuring Georgia Van Etten. It’s a throwback to artists such as Air France and The Tough Alliance. You can catch her perform in Sydney, Geelong, Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart this month.

Adelaide’s Summer Flake caught our attention in October last year with her Time Rolls By EP, and now she’s already back with the first single ‘Shoot And Score‘ off her second record Hello Friends. There’s a heavier grunge element present on ‘Shoot And Score’ then her previous material, and I’m curious to see how the new album plays out live.

At #12 we head up north to Brisbane for the catchiest guitar hook and chorus of the week: Chook Race with ‘At Your Door‘. This very addictive single is the first from their Around The House LP due out later this year via the severely-underrated Brisbane label Tenth Court.

The biggest mover and shaker of the week however is from Melbourne’s Hoodlem with ‘Kintsugi‘. The track has jumped up into #7 with its fusion of oozing bass lines, soul, and soft electronic dabbles. The duo follow in the steps of our local heroes The Harpoons and provide, via sharp craftsmanship, a genuine sexiness that’s often missing from Australia’s music scene. I expect to hear the name Hoodlem a lot more in 2016.

 


25. Flume – ‘Smoke And Retribution’ feat. Vince Staples & Kučka

Uploaded: January 30th


24. River Yarra – ‘Song For Tan’

Uploaded: January 29th


23. Spookyland – ‘God’s Eyes’

Uploaded: January 20th | Last Week: #18


22. Banoffee – ‘With Her (Roland Tings Remix)’

Uploaded: January 27th | Last Week: #17


21. Govs – ‘Let’s Go!’

Uploaded: January 8th | Last Week: #16


20. Wabz – ‘Forest Of Feels’

Uploaded: January 9th | Last Week: #15


19. Esese – ‘For Nuria (Lo-Fi)’

Uploaded: January 23rd | Last Week: #14


18. Letran – ‘71221325-02’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #13


17. Smile – ‘Holiday’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #12


16. Blake Gilray – ‘Coolabah’

Uploaded: January 25th | Last Week: #11


15. S M Jenkins – ‘Mikrowave’

Uploaded: January 11th


14. Alice Ivy – ‘Touch’ feat. Georgia Van Etten

Uploaded: January 27th


13. Summer Flake – ‘Shoot And Score’

Uploaded: January 6th


12. Chook Race – ‘At Your Door’

Uploaded: January 29th


11. Mangelwurzel – ‘I.O.U.’

Uploaded: January 12th | Last Week: #10


10. The Drones – ‘To Think That I Once Loved You’

Uploaded: January 20th | Last Week: #9


9. Courtney Barnett – ‘Three Packs A Day’

Uploaded: January 11th | Last Week: #8


8. Liluzu – ‘Gunko’

Uploaded: January 19th | Last Week: #7


7. Hoodlem – ‘Kintsugi’

Uploaded: January 29th


6. Le Pie – ‘Up All Night’

Uploaded: January 19th | Last Week: #6


5. Cale Sexton – ‘Open Minded Meltdown’

Uploaded: January 26th | Last Week: #5


4. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Wither With You’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #4


3. No Zu – ‘Spirit Beat’

Uploaded: January 13th | Last Week: #3


2. Good Morning – ‘To Be Won’

Uploaded: January 21st | Last Week: #2


1. Free Time – ‘Who Owns The Moon?’

Uploaded: January 5th | Last Week: #1


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Photo by Sarah Chav'

04 Jan Roland Tings and Friendships just set the standard for 2016

 

I had never attended the Melbourne venue Howler on a hot night, let alone on a day that had hit 42 degrees Celsius, and was still above 30 during Roland Tings’ 12-1am set. I guess I just expected one of Melbourne’s newest venues to be well air conditioned, but even Howler struggled to handle the heat, and it didn’t help that the show was packed out. However, what saved the night was Roland Tings’ flawless set, which made sweating out 10 litres of bodily fluids absolutely worth it.

Another aspect that was unusual for Howler on this night was the fact that the lineup also consisted of other house artists such as Chiara Kickdrum, Bronze Savage and Dan White. This turned the crowd into the sort of wild party scene that you’d expect from other Melbourne clubs like Mercat or Boney, rather than the well-behaved music-loving crowd Howler would usually draw for bands. After all, the stage features a stack of foldback monitors, making it as wide as average festival stage, and a better fit for bands than DJs. Rohan Newman knew he had to take full advantage of it, and he brought in the A/V duo Friendships to provide the spot-on VJ’ing visuals in the background – which I’ll dissect shortly.

 

 

Rohan boldly took the stage in a top buttoned-up shirt and with a bottle of champagne in his hand, but after just ten minutes he was already already feeling the heat, and resorted to drinking water for the rest of the set. He had only introduced a few kick beats, patiently taking his time, and he had the crowd in the palm of his hand – I didn’t hear one person complain throughout the introduction. As tracks from his debut album began to slide in, it became clear that every track was a slightly extended or more layered form of its album version. ‘Organic’ would best describe Roland Tings’ transitions, with no sharp turns or startling moments, but he also challenges the listener from time to time with buzz noises and slow downs.

While he had everyone dancing, jumping around and climbing up on top of the couches at the back, there was another element to this show that made this Roland Tings set feel like a steal of an entry price – the visuals in the background. Aware that pastel colours and simple shapes are Roland’s aesthetic, Friendships morphed them perfectly to the music, never trying to do too much or lose your interest through repetition.

 

 

The visual highlight and moment of the night was the drop during ‘Pala‘. A single elephant casually walked around the screen throughout (coincidentally fitting the hot theme of the night) and then, when the drop finally happened, the elephant exploded into several faster moving siblings – and the crowd literally lost their minds. Rohan even took a break to dance and turn around to appreciate the visuals. Everyone was loving it, and the entire crowd appeared to know all of Roland Tings’ tunes from their very first beats, smelling blood frequently before even my sober self knew which track was emerging.

The night really proved how big a difference well-executed projections can make, and that Roland Tings needs to make this a regular live feature – the red LED lights and smoke machine did the job during his Paradise Music Festival set, but weren’t particularly memorable. This set’s only negative, on the other hand, was that there wasn’t more of it.

 

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29 Dec 100 Best Australian Tracks of 2015


Without a doubt 2015 has been the best year in the history of Australian music. The amount of quality tracks and artists that we couldn’t fit into this list was astounding.
What’s particularly exciting is the fact that most of these artists are new, which makes the prospect of putting together next year’s list seem even more daunting.

We would like to thank all the artists for making the music, the readers who share our site’s content, the writers who contributed this year, and everyone else who makes the Australian music scene extremely enjoyable to be a part of in our own small way.

Let’s do it all again in 2016.

100. Knightlife – ‘Solstice’

99. LUCIANBLOMKAMP – ‘From Afar’

98. Jess Ribeiro – ‘Kill it Yourself’

97. Oisima – ‘Take Your Time’

96. Flamingo Jones – ‘Skinny D.I.P.’

95. The Ocean Party – ‘Black Blood’

94. Cleopold – ‘Down In Flames’

93. Harvey Sutherland – ‘That’s The Fact, Jack’

92. Cool Sounds – ‘Control’

91. Bad//Dreems – ‘Hiding To Nothing’

90. Total Giovanni – ‘Paradise’

89. Woollen Kits – ‘Girl With Heart’

88. Zone Out – ‘Inside’

87. Frances Fox – ‘Jake The Flake’

86. Low Lux – ‘Rivers Roll’

85. Redspencer – ‘Ride It Out’

84. Abelard – ‘I’m OK For Now’

83. SMILE – ‘Boundless Plains To Share’

82. Snowy Nasdaq & Snowy Life – ‘Ironic Life’

81. Fraser A. Gorman – ‘Blues Run The Game’

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