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03 Jul 2018 Half Time: Top 50 Australian Tracks


Photos by Sarah Chavdaroska


Life is getting busier and busier every year, it’s becoming harder and harder to follow all the great stuff coming out of the Australian music scene that’s continuing to grow into its own unique ecosystem. We really enjoyed pulling together a half time 2017 top 50 post last year, so we knew we had do it again this year. Hopefully it helps get yourself and your friends up to speed on what’s been happening in Australian music throughout 2018.

We’ve listed the variety of tracks in alphabetical order to save some of the list fun for the end of year top 100 post, plus it can take all year to truly disgust the most memorable tracks. We’ve created the playlist on both Spotify and SoundCloud.

As always, we want to take this opportunity to send out a huge thank you to everyone who has sent us music this year, contacted us, shared, liked, commented or re-tweeted Ripe.

spotifysoundcloud

1. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’

2. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’

3. Baby Blue – ‘I Like You’

4. Big White – Right Before Everything Dies’

5. Body Type – ‘Arrow’

6. Cable Ties – ‘Choking To Choose’

7. Camp Cope – ‘How To Socialise & Make Friends’

8. Caroline No – ‘Alex’

9. Chiara Kickdrum – ‘Moebius’

10. Courtney Barnett – ‘City Looks Pretty’

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02 Jul INTRODUCING: Luboku


Photos by Sarah Chavdaroska


Since 2014 Melbourne producer, singer and songwriter Luboku has been steadily releasing music online. Collaborative work with NZ-based Hosaia and last year’s solo release ‘The Surface‘ has seen his name popping up more frequently and with growing praise.

This year, after already releasing two singles ‘Without You‘ and ‘None Of You‘, Luboku’s burgeoning career has started to take off – with a Triple J ‘Feature Artist’ select, support-spot on What So Not‘s national tour and his recent signing to Niche Talent Agency‘s growing roster of amazing artists.

After the busy start to the year, we managed to squeeze in some time with Luis Kennett (aka Luboku) to have a chat and get to know him. We wanted to understand from his perspective how he has found this year so far, how he discovered his visual-aesthetic and what he has planned in the near future for shows and releases.

 

Tell us about Luboku. Who is he? Where did his passion for electronic production come from?

Luis Kennett: Luboku is many things, sometimes a musical vampire, sometimes a balladeer, always making songs though, that’s the important part. Luboku came about because I needed something to focus my creativity toward. I can focus inspiration more clearly when I have something specific to work on so it came out of necessity, to be honest.

‘Without You’ which was released earlier this year is a stellar track! How did that track come to be?

Luis: Why thank you, I guess people are really digging it! I had a lot of fun making that song and I think that comes through. ‘Without You’ was also one of the quickest songs to come together so far, it always felt a bit edgy. Simon Lam (Kllo, Nearly Oratorio) helped me mix this one actually, he managed to pull in some of that edginess but keep a really great vibe which was just ace.

Your John Fish video collaboration and music artwork is all very visually appealing, carrying a very strong aesthetic. Trying to balance music and visual expression is a particularly important thing at the moment for a lot of artists. Who designed your cover art? Tell us a bit about that process.

Luis: A Melbourne designer named Darren Oorloff, in collaboration with Nick Keays, created these first few pieces. I’ve felt really lucky that they’ve been on board with all my ideas and have executed an aesthetic that I am 100% behind. I feel very strongly that visuals and music work hand-in-hand, carrying a desired look and feel through any art form I’m creating.

A John Fish video also makes me *crosses fingers* expectant of a big light or visual show on the horizon?

Luis: Big light show? Of course! Working with John Fish on the video for ‘Without You’ has definitely given me some ideas on what a BIG headline or festival slot could look like.

Only the other weekend you were a support act for the Melbourne leg of What So Not’s Australian National Tour at The Forum Theatre. Tell us about how that came about! How did you find the support act spot on such a large, electronic tour?

Luis: The show was wild, one of my favorites so far. As for the opportunity, that’s something I did not see coming. All of a sudden I’m on the phone to Triple J Unearthed, being asked to play the Forum Theatre with What So Not, it was all pretty crazy. The hardest parts of playing live, I find, are always the moments just before the show – you feel like you’re waiting in live music limbo. The best thing was getting out there and playing the new live set, it was so much fun.

Last week you released your new single ‘None Of You’ and already it’s taking off – congratulations on such a solid release! Tell us about ‘None Of You’ and (if I’m not mistaken) if there is a theme connecting your two new singles?

Luis: Thank you, I’m glad you vibe it! I guess ‘None Of You’ is a pretty personal track for me. It’s about a time when I was struggling to connect with someone who was going through some stuff, sometimes that person doesn’t have any space for you and I think this song captures how I felt about that whole situation. I have always felt ‘None Of You’ and ‘Without You’ to be Ying/Yang (hence the piano at the end of Without You) – they are definitely connected. But that needs more context… There is an EP coming!

If you could play one stage or one event in the next year, what would it be and why is that your pick?

Luis: This is a bit left of field but I think the Boiler Room live stream gigs are pretty iconic, tonnes of people moshing around you as you’re performing to an endless amount of people online, that would be so sick.

Do you have any future collaborations in the works? (Dreams collaborations welcome.)

Luis: Nothing I can talk about yet… I’ve got a secret passion for really heavy hip hop though, I think a dream collaborator would be Run The Jewels but perhaps that’s a bit ambitious, for now?

As a producer and song-writer in Australia, do you think that the music industry is helping young, emerging artists make a break? Or is it a tough job and difficult to navigate with the sheer amount of new artists?

Luis: I couldn’t think of a better place to start a career in music. Australia, and Melbourne in particular, have such vibrant communities, I feel like creativity flourishes here. There are also many opportunities for up and comers in the live arena and with platforms like Triple J Unearthed the ease of discovery makes things pretty accessible (they listen to everything! That’s intense). Shoutout to my manager Brandon who’s been a literal lifesaver (haha).

Plans for the rest of the year?

Luis: More tunes! And lot’s more shows.

 


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25 Mar Aiming To Inspire Victorians – An Interview With By The Meadow


Words by Marcus Rimondini // Photos by Sarah Chav’ & By The Meadow Team


By The Meadow is a Music Festival set 90 minutes south-west of Melbourne in Bambra. They started in 2014 and they have slowly and carefully built up a respected fan base. This year marks their 5th festival and it’s their biggest lineup to date. In fact, I don’t believe there’s a better snapshot of 2018 Melbourne (plus a few imports) via a festival lineup. Without Paradise Music Festival or Shady Cottage this year, the spotlight is brighter on By The Meadow than ever and it sounds like they’re more than ready.

A few weeks ago we caught up Cameron and Ruby, two of the festival organisers. We discussed all the usual questions about running a small festival, but it was really their emphasis on the concept of local that made me believe this festival truly does care more about people than trying to make money or become the next big hot festival. By The Meadow wants to bring what they love about Melbourne to a region of Victoria that’s going through changes and deserves to be a part of the excitement, hoping to inspire the next generation to take part.

I was originally keen on attending based on the fantastic lineup alone, but now I just want to support the great cause that is By The Meadow. Tickets are still available if you not only feel like a good time, but want to also support our locals doing great things.

 

Marcus Rimondini: What’s the story behind how the festival started?

Ruby: Well, Cameron, for his 21st, had a festival party at his parents’ property.

Cameron: We had two 21sts in a row, mine and then my brother’s the year after and then the next year there was no birthday.

Ruby: So we were like, we just want to have a party, and my parents had a property, and so we started it there. It was really good for us to do it there, and the local community was really good.

How many people were there?

Ruby: The first year was 200…

Cameron: I think we capped it at 200, but we were pushing so many boundaries, we ended up saying “let’s just stop at 150 and it’ll be good.” Sold it in two weeks, didn’t have any permits, and just said if you want to make a donation at the gate to cover the generator *laughs*, that would be great.

Ruby: And we did cover it. The next year I thought, I don’t want my parents to lose their property because something happens, so we started getting permits, and then it started getting bigger, so we had it at my parents’ farm again. The year after (the third year), some of my very good friends’ parents’ were nice enough to let us expand on to their property, which is about 100m away over the hill.

Are they your closest neighbours?

Ruby: They’re not the closest neighbours, but it’s a lot bigger space for us, they loved the festival, and they were just like “yeah come have it at our house, we’ve got more room, more spaces for camping.

Cameron: We’ve gone from this tiny little spot. It was originally ‘by the meadow’ because it was going to be on the deck of a house, which would look out into the meadow. But we were like “ we cannot put this here,” so we put it in the meadow *laughs*. So we went from down in the bottom of this valley, where her parents house is. And now we have this site that’s right up on top of Bambra, and the view is mental. You just get this whole sweeping view of the flat plains out the back of Geelong.

Ruby: And this will be our third year (fifth overall) doing it there.

 

Was the first one in the back of a truck?

Cameron: Yeah, the first three were in the back of the same truck.

Ruby: And we had to wait until after business hours on Friday to set it up.

Cameron: It was stressful as. We had music starting at 10 am on the Saturday morning, after the trucks only shows up at 6 pm the night before… AND we had to deck the whole thing out like a professional stage.

Ruby: And then when we started doing the Friday night as well, we couldn’t get the truck in time, so now we have a proper stage.

Cameron: We now have the luxury of delivering a better package for the punters too, we can it in on a Wednesday, and then have all of Thursday and a good chunk of Friday to build something that looks really nice against the background.

Ruby: It started very DIY — and we’re trying, we’re slowly building it up *laughs*. We still like to keep it very local and what we really love, too, and lots of everyone being very involved. So hopefully we’re making it a bit cleaner, a bit more professional too.

What are some of the main things that have changed over the five years, aside from the stage?

Ruby: I think we have learnt that sometimes you need to outsource more and spend a bit more money to make it easier in the long run.

Cameron: Yeah, we’ve kind of ended up focusing on the core part that people enjoy, and then handing off a lot of the other stuff. So we’re involved in making sure that the lineup is amazing, and the sound that delivers the lineup to the punters is as good as we can get. We’ve been so lucky, the sound guys we started with have been phenomenal, they’re audio nerds, they’re amazing. We work pretty close with the food, we think that’s a pretty core part as to why people dig festivals. We try to keep it local as well.

Ruby: Really local, so it has been one of our very good friends for the first couple of years.

Cameron: So we’ve had a chef from back home in Colac, we get him to pick a pop-up menu for the weekend. The food’s important, making sure all that stuff is consistent.

Ruby: We want to make sure it’s good food, but not super expensive. We’re really lucky, Cameron has a motorbike shop, so he has access to a lot of things that we need. My dad and my brothers are builders, without them — at the start especially — we wouldn’t have been able to do it.

So you get the whole family to help out?

Ruby: We get my brother’s friends, and Cameron’s brother’s friends come down.

Cameron: They’ll be there for like six or so days. They’ll work hard a couple days before, then enjoy the festival, and then on a Sunday morning when they’re feeling like dirtbags, they’ll be the ones working the hardest.

Ruby: They’re very good, they put up with a lot, but they have a very good time at it as well.

Cameron: That stuff all around the outside has changed, but what we deliver in the middle is identical. We just try to take a really tidy snapshot of what’s up and coming in music around here (northside Melbourne).

 

Was there anything in particular you were looking to mix up this year with the lineup?

Cameron: I guess we need to talk about gender equality on the bill. We’re super conscious of it now. We always tried to cater towards gender equality, and I think we managed to do so pretty well from the outset like we had Ali Barter headlining four years ago. Now that there are people specifically going out and pointing out the percentage of females in your lineup, it really makes a good point. And when you see a lot of festivals that don’t, you think, you’ve got to do something about it. There’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to, given where we are and what we have access to. So we’re extremely conscious of trying to book an equal lineup and I think this year we have over 50% bands with female members in them, we’re pretty happy with that. But it is difficult to do so still; it takes way more work, and it would be far easier to ignore, but that’s a big part of what we set out to do this year.

Do you feel the genres are a little more varied?

Ruby: Yeah, I guess we like to put bands on that we’re going to have fun listening to, mostly.

Cameron: We’ll spend a lot of time going out and seeing these bands.

Ruby: We’re there working, but we want to hear it and be having a good time, and see people having a good time.

Cameron: So if it’s varied, it’s just an indication of what we’ve been listening to in the last 12 to 18 months. But it doesn’t feel that much more varied, I think there’s less hip-hop than we’ve had in the past.

Ruby: This is off the record, but I love hip-hop! So that’s a real disappointment to me.

Cameron: We normally tried to get two or three, but this year we’ve just got HTMLFlowers, 30/70 is I guess a little bit swinging towards hip-hop, but we definitely don’t have as much clear cut hip-hop on the bill this year as normal. There really is no picture, we’ll go out targeting some big acts to head the bill, and then fill in below, as to where we need to find the diversity. If we have heaps of rock bands, we’ll find pop bands and electronic music..”

Ruby: It’s nearly a bit selfish because it’s all just bands we love to listen to, but we think other people will enjoy it as well.

Cameron: It also has to represent either somebody who has put out a debut album that’s doing really well, or somebody that’s emerging and showing such clear talent that they’re going to go somewhere. There are not many bands on our bill that have been just punching around in the middle of the music scene for a long time.

Ruby: What I really like about Meadow is that a lot of it’s done by word-of-mouth, by people who have been before and then their friends come and they’re like, “this is amazing!” Or you go out to a bar and someone’s wearing a By The Meadow t-shirt and they’re talking about how good it was. It’s really nice to hear that, we don’t do that much advertising.

Cameron: We shut it down (during the year).

Ruby: We want to maintain the vibe of people being friendly to each other, we don’t want to cater to a completely different audience. The people who come are amazing people. You want their friends, and the people they would be with to come as well.

Did you have any issues leading up to this festival?

Cameron: This one’s been as smooth as anything. Early on we had some sound pollution issues with neighbours, but you work through those, and you try and build some relationships with those neighbours.

Ruby: It was funny because some of the biggest issues were with neighbours who actually came from Melbourne and had a holiday home.

Cameron: We’ve had nothing this year.

Ruby: Or last year.

Cameron: The hardest things would’ve been in just the band booking. Last year I was away through October, November and start of December in Detroit. That was difficult trying to book a bill from the other side of the world, because it would be like one email a day, if they came back with a bad answer, I’d be like “shit I’ve wasted another day.” I underestimated how hard it would be to converse back and forth. So the bill came out a bit later than we hoped, but that was it, we got there in the end.

 

What are some of the highlights of the previous years?

Cameron: One of the best ones for me was when I was at the urinal, and this bloke pulled up next to me and he’s like “you run this thing don’t you, you’re one of the ones who runs it, this is great, it’s like a house, but outside and not at a house.” It was like the best thing to hear. This guy was clearly wrecked, but I was like “oh my god, he’s so wise.”

So why the weekend after Easter?

Ruby: It’s a weird time of the year, because you’ve probably just gone to Golden Plains and then pay three weeks later to go to another festival. It’s necessary for us, because of the area we’re in, it has to be out of total fire ban season. We couldn’t do it any earlier than when we do it.

Cameron: Yeah, I don’t how Easter works, but it moves a lot *laughs*. It like follows a full moon or something. We pushed last year forward, because Easter was late April. We just get guided by the first weekend of April, otherwise we try to go the weekend after Easter. Because we’re all working, so we all need that time off over Easter to go and set it up. Last year was hard, because we were all trying to get time off work the week before to go and do it. The idea at first was to go the opposite time of the year to Paradise Music Festival.

Does the timing of the festival worry you financially?

Ruby: We’re really careful with what we spend money on.

Cameron: It would be so easy to go out and spend so much money on a bill, and make an amazing bill and still not get that audience down there. This year was the biggest step we’ve ever taken. But we’ll end in the same position again, net zero, everyone’s had a good time, and we’ll be like “thank god we didn’t lose any money!” You learn so much, and you just make so many connections and meet so many people, you won’t get that from going to gigs or being in a band or whatever, you just don’t learn the same stuff.

How’s the weather in April?

Ruby: Well ours was a little bit colder than usual last year; it wasn’t super cold, but it was colder. I actually noticed a drop in the visits to the first aid tent for people who got thorns in their feet and stuff — everyone was wearing shoes, which is alright!

Where do you source your artists from?

Cameron: We start booking kind of around BIGSOUND time, which is a good indicator of what’s going to go well, but you have to be careful, too. There’s also Melbourne Music Week. We source from everywhere, if you went to one source only, you wouldn’t get a very good picture of what’s happening right now.

Have you tried to reach a crowd that’s outside of the Melbourne bubble?

Cameron: We advertised for the first time, because I truly believe there’s got to be a bunch of kids in that Torquay area, there’s got to be a massive audience down there of this young population, even young families. But maybe we’re too early, and they’re going to have kids, and their kids are going to be ready for festivals. There’s just this massive population boom in and around Torquay and that side of Geelong.

Ruby: I think it’s getting them there in the first place. This isn’t meaning to speak bad of the country people, because I’m from there, but a lot of the bands we’re having are well-known in Melbourne, but not so well-known in country areas. Once people come though, they tend to come back, again and again, it’s a lot to do with them loving the music.

Cameron: I think there will be more people from that area eventually engaging with it. I think Geelong is coming up again, there are a few music venues popping up there now. Better bands are touring out there. Ten years ago they had really good music culture coming out of Geelong, it’s where like King Gizzard and The Murlocs started out. Then it died and all the cool pubs that bands played at, closed. It’s coming back, Workers Club is helping. So here’s hoping there will be more of an audience, because that’s 20 minutes from us, half an hour from Bambra.

What are some of the things about running a festival that are much harder than you expected?

Cameron: We didn’t have any experience. We went to the council and were like “how do you run an event?” like “what do we legally have to do to run this?” Then she started calling in police officers and CFA people to talk to us. We were like 21, and the police officer was like “what are you going to do when somebody dies of a drug overdose?” It was just frustrating being talked down to, we were trying to do the right thing.

Ruby: It’s a weird situation especially with drug talk, a lot of people said “what are you going to do to prevent this?” Well we’re trying to promote a culture where it’s not encouraged, and at the same time we’re going to have everything available in the event that something does happen. Originally they wanted us to put security cameras on every tree. This is when we had 400 people coming to the festival, we couldn’t even afford lights for the campground.

Cam: They were the biggest hurdles, and now that they know we’ve got the ability to run it, we’ve kept people safe for five years in a row down there. That hurdle kind of disappeared.

 

If you had more money, what would you do to the festival?

Cameron: I wouldn’t change much to be honest.

Ruby: We would probably hire people to do all the work that our dads do, so they wouldn’t have to do it.

Cameron: That’s actually a good one *laughs*. But it wouldn’t matter, they would find something else. If I get somebody else to do the things dad will do, dad will find something else that needs doing, it doesn’t matter if there’s nothing left to do. He will find something.

Ruby: They do love it, though.

Cameron: We’re nearly where we need to be for it to run successfully, and to give us the opportunity to do it again next year. We’re pretty happy. We love the way that it’s forced upon anyone, it’s not on giant billboards or anything. I don’t know if you got the press release, but we get our beers from the guys down the road, our wines from a local winery, our food from our friends in now Lorne, one from Aireys Inlet, and one from Colac. We’re pretty passionate about keeping that stuff strictly local, and deliberately steering clear of food trucks. So there will not be a food truck at our festival.

Ruby: Our stage comes from Winchelsea primary school, which is a primary school about ten minutes away, we have a guy from Colac who brings us a truck full of ice, our sound guys come from Geelong, and the coffee comes from Apollo Bay. Everything we can do, we try and keep really local!


 


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02 Mar Cities, Scenes and Radio – An Interview with Moxie


NTS Radio host, founder of On Loop record label and parties, and general music enthusiast Moxie has been on tour throughout Australia, bringing her taste and energy to such cities as Sydney and Brisbane. Tonight she is set to play at Hugs and Kisses, for an intimate evening of dance. We had a chat to the London based DJ about her city, her experience of radio and university.

You have spent all your life in London, how has music contributed to a sense of belonging in the city?
Community is a big part of London and if you open yourself up to meeting people you can come across some truly exceptional characters. Especially at events such as Notting Hill Carnival & the rave scene. I’ve made so many friends from being at those types of events, some I only ever see in those spaces but when you’re all experiencing that same magical moment at the same time it brings you together. I love London and all the different people that live here, especially walking through certain areas, mostly markets and hearing people blast music from their stalls. For me that’s what makes London so special, all the different people who make it what it is.

You have mentioned that you studied at London College Of Communication (a fair while ago now), what was a project at uni you worked on that you would like to revisit today?
Ahh yes, my uni years. Feels so long ago now and I really miss it. I studied my foundation course at Central St Martins and then went on to do my Bachelors degree in print design at LCC. It was a pretty open course and I went onto design wall paper, ceramics, fabrics and screen prints. I especially loved painting with Gouache and my final degree was all about Tropical parrots. I’d like to start incorporating it back into my music stuff, especially with the label side of things. I’ve actually set some time aside to get back on it in April which I’m really excited about!

You have your finger on the pulse when it comes to up and coming artists/producers/dj’s, how important is it to you to bring into light new music?
It’s super important to know what the next generation are up to. I’ve always tried to be as open as possible. I remember when I was younger, the older crew would have a condescending attitude and say things such as “it wasn’t how it used to be” and all of that stuff, which I found really undermining. Everyone has their own journey and things change, we need to embrace that.

What is some advice you would give to such aspiring artists/producers/dj’s trying to get their music heard?
I’d say try to educate yourself as much as possible on what labels you like and where you think your music would sit best. Don’t send every single track you’ve ever made, tailor it to who you’re emailing and send the best of the best. Maybe no more than 4 tracks. The more time you take to write an email, the more someone will take to read it. Especially if you show you genuinely like or know what that person is about.

London’s radio culture is thriving, with the likes of Balamii, Netil and 199 radio further contributing to an already established scene, what could these stations (including NTS) do to further London’s and the Worlds music scene?
I can’t speak for the others but watching how NTS programme events all around the world and making sure to reflect the scenes they broadcast from is inspiring. They’re all music heads and are about discovering the most interesting and diverse music as possible. Back home they push the new and local talent which I also think is super important. You can have the big names, but if you’re not helping out the next generation then there’s only so far you can go. Radio is such a great starting platform and it’s definitely helped me loads in becoming who I am.

Over the years, what are some personal values you have taken from radio, clubbing and music in general?
Push yourself out of your comfort zone and don’t worry about failing. Everyone has to start somewhere and you can surprise yourself. I never thought I’d get into radio, but it just happened and here I am 7 years later.

What is the sort of vibe you are expecting at your Melbourne show? 

I’ve always heard great things about Melbourne, especially the club I’m playing at tonight called Hugs & Kisses. The whole tour’s been great, but I’ve been most excited about here. There seems to be a real strong sense of community and everyone knows each other which i love.  
Are you familiar with many Australian artists? If so who and how did you find them, meet them?  

On my travels I’ve been trying to educate myself on the scene as much as possible and for my next NTS show I’m planning an Australian take over. Names that I’m especially excited about are Roza Terenzi, Prequel, Tambo’s House, Turner Street Sound, Ken Oath & a bunch more. Also Michael from Noise In My Head is always repping loads of great stuff and Butter Sessions are putting out some quality music. I feel like there’s still loads for me to discover which is always exciting! 

Moxie plays Hugs & Kisses tonight. Tickets here via Resident Advisor.


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24 Dec The 100 Best Australian Tracks 2017


Looking back on the year that’s been, 2017 has been exceptional. So many of our Aussie artists have exploded overseas, exposing the amazing talent we have here. The element of live performance has also evolved, as we see more and more the creative and the adored putting on insane performances that leave us all in awe.
It is truly an inspiring time in Australian music to see the growth and abundance of talent.

Therefore, as is tradition, we have compiled what we hope to be a comprehensive, exciting and awe-inspiring list of great Australian music.
The list doesn’t just feature a diverse range of genres. It is rightfully made up of many different artists from all walks of life. We’re absolutely delighted to see such a spectrum of artists receiving the attention they deserve!

To help accommodate (and celebrate) as many great tracks as we can, we have decided to limit our annual Australian Top 100 Tracks list to only one song per artist.

We’d also like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who emailed and submitted music, liked, shared, retweeted or @tagged this year. It means a lot to the whole Ripe team. Let’s do it all again in 2018!

spotifysoundcloud

100. Doona Waves – ‘Come Around’

99. Kaiit – ‘2000 n Somethin’

98. Mount Trout – ‘Home’

97. Sloan Peterson – ‘105’

96. Nali – ‘D.R.D (B2H002)’

95. Georgia Mulligan – ‘Any Given Day’

94. Mic Mills – ‘Too Hot To Sleep’

93. Huntly – ‘Kate’s Bed’

92. Exhibitionist – ‘Hands’

91. Godtet – ‘Take Off’

90. Michael Beach – ‘I Never Had Enough Time With You’

89. No Mono – ‘Butterflies’

88. Rough River – ‘True Wild’

87. No Sister – ‘Overpass’

86. Total Control – ‘Vanity’

85. Milwaukee Banks – ‘The City’

84. Other Places – ‘T.R.N.’

83. Angharad Drake – ‘Baby’

82. S Y Orosa – ‘You.’

81. Trevor – ‘Sensual Mediation’

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27 Nov Face The Music 2017: Recap


Words by Elvis Walsh


From Ariel Pink’s ‘scatological’ cycle of creativity, to the deeply intertwined cultures of Krautrock and the Aussie music scene, Face the Music 2017 was as interesting and educational as it was diverse and expansive in topics. The two day Australian music industry conference, annexed by Melbourne music institution The Push, is in its 10th year, marking a milestone in public arts and the local music industry. An absolute Mecca for aspiring youth craving to cut their teeth in the music scene, as well as seasoned veterans willing to explore the infinite facets of an ever moving culture, Face the Music prides themselves on their scholarly speakers and the spectrum of expertise brought with them, ensuring a fascinating experience for attendees with a plethora of musical backgrounds.

This year’s was based out of the grand St Paul’s Cathedral, an iconic central Melbourne landmark in its own right. The conference took place over eight separate venues, often running over four sessions at once. The breadth of topics and range of geographic, gender, racial and cultural backgrounds of the over 100 speakers is obvious draw card for the conference’s continual turn out, with purple lanyard sporting conference dwellers to be found in every corner of the CBD.

Kicking off the first day was a keynote panel featuring the ever exciting and enigmatic Ariel Pink, offering intimate insight into his creative processes and influences, including the unusual and poignant story behind his latest album Dedicated to Bobby Jameson. Later, and certainly a highlight for the day, the panel ‘Whitewashed’ tackled the prominent issue of the misrepresentation of people of colour throughout the industry, spawning debate and praise throughout conversations overheard around the cathedral.

Taking an international perspective, through the Victorian Govt.’s brand new ‘Music Passport’ program, there were a range of German guest speakers representing names such as Hamburg’s Reeperbahn Fest and German label Kontor Records. These speakers gave interesting advice for Australian musicians regarding the mega yet obscure market of the German live music scene. Concluding the first day were local artists Body Type and Press Club supporting the ever invigorating Kirin J. Callinan on the St. Paul’s stage for a free show, accessible to anyone so inclined.

Day two began with Herald Sun’s musical ex Mikey Cahill with a nostalgic retrospect of Melbourne music. Simultaneously, talks on artist management essentials such as exposure and accounting took place across the seven other venues. Later on was the hugely popular Planet Radio featuring Cheryl Waters, globally renowned DJ, programmer and host for Seattle’s KEXP radio station. You may be familiar with our own King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard’s numerous appearances on the station. Spread amongst the remaining day were numerous discussions and panels, including Marky Ramone, who featured in conversation on the ins and outs of the dense yet rewarding and expressive industry. Again, to top it off was ‘Cookin’ with Kirin J. Callinan, an interview/showcase of Kirin’s culinary skills and inner thoughts as an artist, cooking and divulging live from the carpark.

To mention every standalone event held at the conference within one article would result in a short book. This year’s event has topped its previous year’s yet again, with a larger turnout every iteration, and a continually impressive lineup of speakers.
For any person even remotely interested in music or behind the scenes of your favourite artists, festivals or labels, Face the Music is an amazing resource at your disposal.


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06 Nov From a spontaneous night in Geelong to a growing ensemble of musicians – An interview with Eastern Seaboard Electric Soul Ensemble


It feels contrived to label music, sometimes. After discovering the range of musical influences inspiring ESESE (Eastern Seaboard Electric Soul Ensemble) to create their unique sound, I felt inspired and refreshed. Chatting to the humble musicians Matt and Henok left me feeling their glow. It was such pleasure sitting down with the two and discussing their musical odysseys, creative processes and what inspires them.

ESESE have created their own sound. So it was no surprise to discover the vast array of music with which they have been surrounded throughout their lives. Having dissimilar upbringings with music, the pair use their diverse and wide palette of music taste to bring new flavours and create their own unique fusion of sounds and genres.

Matt went from Michael Jackson to early 2000s, metal to British psychedelia and swing – which he recognises is from where his love for brass stems. Henok’s music timeline started with his family introducing him to albums like Encore by Eminem and Public Enemy. 

When Henok started skating in grade five he naturally got into punk: “Cheesy punk like Avril Lavigne, Green Day and Blink 182. But I liked Sex Pistols as well. But then I got into house – terrible house. Then just back to hip-hop. I found internet rap. Wiz khalifa’s mixtape made me start looking for music online instead of the radio and that just changed everything. I like jazz too but to be honest as of late I haven’t been listening to music at all, I’ve just been listening to podcasts. I have little pockets — the last great records I listened to were J.I.D’s Never Story and Saba‘s Bucket List.”

Music hunting can be overwhelming with so much content out there. Matt always goes back to Dorothy Ashby as a source of inspiration.

Matt: “She is a 1960s harpist who delved into jazz and afro-beat territories. There’s this one record called Afro-harping and I keep going back to it. The other sort of beat stuff I’ve been listening to is South African house; afro-house in general, there’s a lot of auxiliary percussion – it’s cool to DJ.”

ESESE have just released two new singles, “Slow Down” and “Home“. The pair have been sitting on the original structures for about a year and a half until they collaboratively approached them as songs.

Matt: “The original structures of the song started with me jamming on a Saturday night as an alternative to going out and getting wasted. It was our Saturday night protest to going out and it turned into being, you know, lively, which was pretty fun.”

“Slow Down” went from horns and instrumental structures to a funky up-beat jam about not taking requests as a DJ – something each member, among most DJs, have to deal with on at least a weekly basis. With their long time collaborator and long time jammer” (as Henok fondly describes) Cazeaux O.S.L.O bringing his unreserved verse to the track effortlessly.

Matt: “Having him involved was a blessing, really. He comes with so much knowledge. A lot of us have to DJ to make money and there is that element of getting accosted by a bunch of drunk people on Friday or Saturday nights. Whether it’s a grand final or hens night, they can be quite rude and demanding. He (O.S.L.O) actually put this thing up on Facebook saying this [track] is about the ‘what’s this?’ philosophy as opposed to the ‘play this.’ He put it eloquently.”

Certainly a philosophy Matt and Henok share, as the pair became friends through DJing. When asked about the conception of ESESE, it was refreshing to see their anecdotes jog each other’s memories further. As they reminisced, Henok realised that the birth of ESESE was in the very building in which we were chatting (The Toff).

Henok: “So my housemate at the time, he DJed at a club called Home-house, which was a super-club in Geelong. I finished DJing in the city and we picked up my housemate and we just thought ‘let’s see if matt wants to come’ – this is about within a month of knowing him. I’d been DJing with him every week. I was like ‘it’s just an hour drive!'”

Even though it was 1am, the hour drive lead them to discover each other’s musical interests and talents. Matt, later into the night/morning, discovered that Henok made music and Henok introduced Matt to new sub-genres of hip-hop of which he had never heard. Playing Chance the Rapper‘s Acid Rap to Matt in the car was perhaps the catalyst to ESESE – the soulful, big band fusion of genres greatly inspiring them.

Henok: “And then that coming Monday we started meeting at his house every few days and making music. We made three demos over the next few months.”

This took place in 2013, but they look back on this night as though it happened a generation ago — which makes sense considering how much ESESE has grown since then. Each memory they shared continued to unlock further memories, anecdotes and nostalgic laughs that spoke the depth of their friendship.

Individually, Henok has been making music for around six years and Matt, eighteen years. While Henok has always been making hip-hop, when Matt first started he was making — as Henok jokingly describes — “long hair music.”

Matt: “I started with garage-punk, sort of, then got into pop-punk… which naturally went to screamo and hardcore, then to really heavy shit. I started changing up style when I was about eighteen and got into blues and soul. I joined a few bands when I moved to Melbourne. I used to play at this place called The Underground (in Adelaide). There wasn’t much dancing — it was more about spinning the guitar around your neck than anything else.”

I ask them to describe their genre as though they were explaining ESESE  to someone who exclusively listens to “long hair music,” to quote Henok. They go through a vast array of descriptions such as “retro futuristo.” Matt paraphrases one of his loved records from the nineties and Henok lists a range of genres, concluding with “hip-hop jazz soul brass.” They finally lock in “big band hip-hop” as their genre. The eclectic sound has evolved from a friendship to a growing project which sometimes involves the whole twelve piece band.

Henok: “It started as us two and then more joined to fill the gaps in the music. We haven’t fully written altogether in one room yet. We jam and make many songs that we’ve never recorded, so that’s next – fully writing with everybody.”

ESESE will celebrate their release with the full twelve piece band next weekend, November 11 at the Evelyn. Despite the logistical difficulty in bringing the full band together, they’re excited for what’s in store. With a year of weekly jamming practice at the ‘Now Here This’ night at The Toff, we can expect plenty of live improvisation, some crowd interaction and maybe some acts like Baro getting on the mic.

Henok: “We’ve got a trumpet, trombone, two sax players, keys, bass, guitar, drums and vocalists.”

The future for ESESE is full of colour and passion. The raw love for music and genuine energies of both Matt and Henok left me in good spirits. I am so excited for their future. ESESE are currently working on an upcoming album as well as a number of other separate projects. Henok is working on his own production and making beats for a rapper named Piatao. Matt is also working with another artist named Nynno.

In my opinion, ESESE is a realm of sound. While the E on the end of their name stands for ‘Ensemble’ on paper, the E is also open to evolution.

Matt: “Future is anything really. Bring on the Empire. Explosion. Enything.”


Catch ESESE playing with thandoAgung Mango and Lori (DJ set) at the Evelyn on November 11th to celebrate the launch of their latest releases. Grab your tickets here.


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habits

26 Sep Trading Tunes with Habits


I was working with a sound technician the other day, who had seen Habits by accident at their show with Friendships in July at The Night Cat. He couldn’t stop raving about how immersive the show was, and even wanted to relive it via the footage we shot. It was all a reminder for me that Habits are amazingly still relatively unknown, even in Melbourne, among sound technicians, despite blowing minds every time they perform live.

Speaking of performing live, their single launch for ‘Shame/Desire‘ is on the 28th of September at The Curtin with Huntly and Sexistential Waterfall. ‘Shame/Desire’ was our track of the week last month, but don’t just take our word for it – listen and enjoy above. And below you can listen to Habits’ six ‘ultimate dev breakup songs’.

The Irrepressibles – ‘In This Shirt’

“This fucken song. Those strings when they climax is a goddamn punch in the heart. We stumbled across this when we were queer babies and the Anohni-esque vocals and tender orchestral arrangement have haunted us ever since. Simply describing wearing a shirt left behind by a lost love is such an effective vessel for exploring the deeper complexities of those feelings.”

Nils Bech – ‘A Sudden Sickness’

“This one captures the feeling of jealousy, insecurity and/or remorse of being the one who chose to end the relationship. The sudden hot, tingly uncomfortable feeling of being devastated. ‘I drink to get numb/to shut you out’ — literally name a more relatable lyric. To start a new beginning independently post break. We’ve been completely obsessed with this album, and finding a visibly queer Norwegian performance artist-cum-singer, since his album ‘Echo’ came out in late 2016 which is full of the different stages of breakups.”

Kwabs – ‘Perfect Ruin’

“‘Who said we had it all, ur hearts no longer lie’.
It’s a break up song in the wake of a relationship that was supposed to end. Kwabs captures that feeling where you know you’re wrong for each other but you still can’t help feeling sad about the situation and curious about how it could have gone.”

Rowland S Howard – ‘Shut Me Down’

“One of my (Mo’s) fave Rowland tracks, it had me from the first sad strum of the guitar and the repetitive pining ‘I miss you so much’. It has the defeated loneliness that you feel in the middle of the night, the song equivalent of that hurt in your heart and stomach. One of my favourite homegrown songwriters ever.”

Adam Tensta ft. Sibille Attar – ‘Let Me’

“This one forces you into reality. This track is about when you’re too raw to be rational. Maybe one day we’ll be friends but for now, don’t tell me about your new man and I won’t talk about myself either. That bassline itself is a ‘goodbye’ bassline.”

Jennifer Hudson / Dreamgirls – ‘Let Me’

“The ultimate. The everything. A desperate and hopeless plea for a lover to stay. An iconic drag queen number. Our favourite karaoke song. In this version Jennifer Hudson is a goddess and this performance gives us chills even after countless listens (and watches). Some people think musicals are bullshit and that’s their problem because this song is a healing and electric emotional tidal wave.”


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03 Sep Our Highlights of Dekmantel 2017


Words by Blake Creighton // Photos by Yannick Van De Wijngaert


Dekmantel brings together an impeccable lineup, incredible organisation, lush settings, solid sound systems and such a welcoming atmosphere that it is truly a festival that accommodates for a very special time. It also provides a platform for their affiliated and booked artists to test themselves as performers, musicians, DJs, producers and the like. It is a festival that is truly a haven for disco, house, techno, electro, acid breakbeat lovers.

With a significant portion of the world’s top and upcoming DJs, producers and artist all in the one vicinity, the standard of music across the three days was unbelievable. Set after set, the stages were heaving with crowds. Even between sets, the artists themselves could be seen enjoying each other’s craft – dancing and joining in as their peers performed for the crowds.

It was truly a three-day-extravaganza, with so much to be said about every aspect that brought together the pure enjoyment experience. As I spent my time there, I decided to note down my top tracks and sets so I could share them with everyone back home. This is my way of bringing everyone closer to the experience I had, to be right in the thick of it.

 

Phoung-Dan

Calmly taking over from Nina Kraviz, Phoung-Dan dipped into an intrinsic variety of slow jams that entwined into acidic breaks, wonky basslines and humbling movements of abstract sounds. His bubbly stage presence and calm approach on the decks allowed for him to dip and dive through a range of atmospheres that would test and be well received by the many who joined in on his sublime selections.

Rodhad

Having seen Rodhad a couple of times before, I had a feeling that this set was to be one of a kind. The essence of his flow came down to his unique reading of the crowd, feeling their psychedelic energy and perusing abstract sounds. The arrangements slowly built to unremarkable drops that flowed from the speakers in odd yet welcoming time signatures.

Joey Anderson

Just before handing over the speakers to Juju Jordash, Joey Anderson slowly mixed in classic track Trans Europe Express‘ from Kraftwerk, which fit incredibly well with Juju Jordash’s sound, serving to both signal to and toy around with the pair before they begun curating their incredible live set.

Inga Mauer

On three separate occasions, Inga Mauer entranced me through diverse selections and mixing. Piecing together a broad range of trippy tracks at the Red Light Radio stage early in the afternoon on Saturday to a slowly gathering crowd, the intimate setting and energy from Mauer created a fulfilling hour that set her up beautifully for her set at The Selectors.
Mauer’s Selectors set, of which I only caught thirty minutes due to clashes, moved through acid and bass-heavy techno, and was rounded off with a fun stage presence as she kissed ice cubes and threw them to the crowd.
The third and final time that I caught Mauer was at Radion on Monday morning. Walking into the main room as she blasted a post-punk/metal track that was slowly blended into heaving techno, her efforts fell on deaf ears as the babbling crowd were still heavily intoxicated from the day. Despite the lack of attention, Mauer lay down a range of melodic, acidic, entrancing yet heavy tracks till it was Objekt‘s time to take a hold of the decks.

Donato Dozzy & Peter Van Hoesen (hybrid)

Five hours and two geniuses of the minimal/techno/acid scene, who on a number of special occasions have been paired together to enlighten everyone; this time it was in compounds of Dekmantel’s UFO tent. Working together on an almost telepathic level, Van Housen and Dozzy moved through heaving rhythms, structured to slowly build and drop into bending synth, captivating acid, and booming bass lines as rolling percussion swiftly manoeuvred the dance floor.
I partook in the journey for four and half hours of the five and came out of the tent completely mesmerised by what I had witnessed. An unforgettable set that I wish every Dozzy/Van Housen fan gets to experience at least once in their lifetime.

Jon Hopkins

As I was sitting, collecting myself after being blown away by Peter Van Housen and Donato Dozzy’s set, a strong gust of wind brought across a short but intense downpour across the festival site. As many scattered under cover and to the bar to collect their free poncho, I proceeded to be mystified by Jon Hopkins at the back of the Main Stage in the rain as he dropped Daniel Avery‘s ‘Drone Logic‘. Hopkins entranced all that took cover, as a number of people around the edges of the covered area embraced harsh downpour.

Vladamir Ivkovic

It was as if the woodland settings of The Selectors stage was Vladimir’s home, with the festival just so happening to be on his doorstep, as he quietly wandered from his cabin out back to close out Saturday evening. Playing warm natural soundscapes with groovy soulful melodies and baselines, Vladamir slowly built his set from natural instrumentals into reformed electronics that held varied structures and crossed genres; consistently creating a bubbly and heartfelt atmosphere within each mix.

Illum Sphere

After catching the beginning of Illum Sphere’s set, I came back into the Greenhouse to the sounds of this masterpiece that stunningly drifted and built into the next track, creating a sense of suspense as the crowd waited for the anticipated drop.

Karenn

The UFO tent hosted throughout the weekend some of the world’s top techno affiliated artists, and Karenn (Blawan and Periah) for an hour took a hold of everyone’s mind, body and soul. Searching deep into some of the more obscure and hard-hitting sounds, implementing them through energetic structures, they unleashed an intelligent, vibrant and yet savage live set.

Lena Willikens

Playing a 4-5:30 pm slot, Willikens brought animated and bombastic sounds to the bustling and lush settings as the sun shined through the windowed walls of The Greenhouse. Bursting with energy and a clear vision of what she wanted to explore, Willikens instantly fixed everyone’s hangovers and depleted energy reserves from the day/night before, restoring each and every soul through charismatic and genre bending electronics.

 

Orpheu The Wizard

At the end of any festival, everyone scampers to find the perfect finale and as I got a little underwhelmed by the crowds reaction to Objekt & Call Super‘s eclectic set, I set off to find a vibing closing set which so happened to be at the smallest stage of Dekmantel, The Red Light Radio stage.
Playing psychedelic and charismatic house tunes to what would have been 100+ people, Orpheu’s selection built for a grand finale and within each mix had everyone busting out their last moves of the weekend in style.

Objekt

A last special moment was at Radion in the early hours of the morning. After the crowd had dispersed and the loyal music lovers were the only ones left, Objekt dropped a tribal percussion-based gem, Lena Willikens‘ remix, and this brought a heaving atmosphere back into the room.

 


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01 Aug Twitter, Bedroom Suck & Spotify Mistaken Identity – An Interview with Good Morning


Words by Marcus Rimondini // Photos by Sarah Chav’


Good Morning may not be one of those well-known household names in Melbourne at the moment… But they should be. With a recent signing to Bedroom Suck Records, it was an absolute no-brainer to take the opportunity to chat to the Melbourne pair Stefan Blair and Liam Parsons to find out how they’re going.

In the world of laid-back, mellow and subtle artists, it is a rarity to see any bands or solo artists rise up the ranks. For instance Mac DeMarco would be one of the more recent artists to achieve this, and the “feature” that separates Mac from his peers is his humour, whether lyrically or on stage. This is something that Good Morning share with Mac, their ability to laugh and enjoy a good joke. Although I feel at times a more serious nature could help them on their way up, their playful approach to life and music translates to curiosity, and an eagerness to keep an open mind. Their signing with Bedroom Suck (who I feel are heavily underrated, signing some of the best bands in the country) could be that final step-up Good Morning needs to break out and become an industry staple.

So Good Morning is where my money would go at the moment, with a brand new album already recorded, I get the impression that the boys are in a good head space right now. They seem to be taking leaps, with a Europe Tour being the biggest one, and I can’t imagine they’d take these risks unless they believed in the new album. Until it comes out, let’s play catch-up below with Good Morning.

 

Marcus Rimondini: Where have you been hiding for most of this year?
Liam Parsons: Recording, slowly.
Stefan Blair: Mixing some stuff.
Liam: [laughs] Taking ages to finish it. It’s been nice though, no time restraints or anything. We checked out of the whole thing for a while there.

Did you not know the next step after the initial releases?
Liam: We’ve had demos of what the album’s going to be for a year and a half or so…
Stefan: We started mixing it, but it was a bit fucked. So we went back and started again just a few weeks ago.

Are you two mixing it?
Liam: Yeah, [we] tried to do everything this time.

Have you always done everything yourselves?
Liam: It has slowly progressed that way. The first thing we did was recorded and mixed with our friend Hamish Mitchell (I’lls). Then with the second EP we recorded it all ourselves, then mixed with him. Now, with this one, we’re recording and mixing it all ourselves.

How did the Bedroom Suck Records signing happen?
Stefan: One day Joe Alexander just sent me a message on Facebook [laughs]. I think he was just plotting away things, like he usually does, and was interested in doing this re-issue. Which was coincidentally around the time we were thinking about the record and wanted to send it to him anyway.

So he snuck in by just asking about a reissue, but was secretly looking to… ?
Liam: I think secretly we were trying to get the album in.

So you were both secretly trying to play it cool?
Liam: [laughs] Pretty much. I think we both got what we wanted in the end.

 

It looks like you barely have a break from touring until October, is this the longest you have ever toured?
Liam: We have actually never really been on tour… we did go on a trip to New York once for CMJ, but that was just staying in the same place.
Stefan: It was sort of more of a holiday.
Liam: I guess we’ve been to Sydney a couple times? And went to Brisbane once.

Does this tour make you excited or daunted?
Liam: Excited! I haven’t been overseas since CMJ.
Stefan: I’m into it. I like getting out of Melbourne, and visiting somewhere near like Switzerland will be exciting.

Question… Do you get paid more or screwed over more in Switzerland?
Liam: … I don’t know actually [laughs].
Stefan: [laughs] We’ll probably end up spending way more money than we should.
Liam: The beers cost more, that’s for sure.

Has it always been just the four of you in Good Morning?
Liam: Yeah, just the four of us playing live.
Stefan: And Joe’s coming too this time.
Liam: And our friend Kim Ambrosius is over there in Copenhagen. She’s been helping Joe with Bedroom Suck so it should be good. It’s going to be busy I guess.

What’s the jamming/recording process like in Melbourne?
Stefan: We mainly work at home and Liam’s beach house in Lorne.
Liam: … And I guess we are mixing it in my bedroom in Fairfield [laughs].

Did the beach house influence the sound or the atmosphere of the recordings?
Stefan: It kind of sounds glassy?
Liam: [laughs] There’s glass windows everywhere. We recorded the Glory EP there and had a construction site going on next door the whole time. So yes, you can hear hammering and drills in the background. However, there’s no WIFI, no people… it’s good for that. You just kind of sit there, and all of the sudden you’ve been there for 14 hours.
Stefan: You sit there until very early in the morning, go to sleep, wake up and do it again. It’s a nice routine.
Liam: There’s nothing else to do, maybe rent DVDs? [laughs]

 

Do you do anything creative outside of music?
Liam: Not really, we’re not very good at anything else [laughs].
Stefan: We play in other friends bands and stuff like that.
Liam: We try to do our own artwork, posters, and t-shirts!
Stefan: Although, they are usually thrown together in a couple minutes [laughs].

… Is ‘we’ actually just one person?
Stefan: Nah, whoever wants to do it.
Liam: [laughs] Whoever can be bothered.

Is it just you two who record the music? Or do you bring in the band when it comes to recording?
Stefan: We record it all. Some of the songs we will play with the band before we go in and record them. But most of the time we just record them as demo’s and show it to everyone else and see what they make of it.

Has the band always been the same four members?
Liam: It’s always been the four of us because there are more shows at the moment. Not everyone can always make them, so we’ve had Joe filling in on drums and Stefan’s brother on bass for a while as well.

How was the Tasmanian tour?
Liam: So good!
Stefan: It was pretty wild.
Liam: There was this crazy bar called Dan’s Bar in Franklin. It was this weird little alternate universe [laughs].
Stefan: We ended up having an after party at this woman’s house named Jane – she was 82 I think. She had a bunch of us back at her house for drinks and weird stew.
Liam: She was just sitting there drinking goon and chain smoking [laughs].
Liam: There were some good, weird pub shows as well – especially in this place called Wynyard. People were just shouting at us to play covers [laughs]. So it was us TRYING to do that, and making up covers on the spot.

 

Do you guys have any directional changes moving forward? Anything new you want to add to Good Morning, or just more refining?
Liam: We’ve been thinking more keyboard. It’s probably cleaner.
Stefan: Yeah, more saxophone as well. A lot of it was written on keys, there wasn’t much of that before.
Liam: No huge effort put into changing things, but it has naturally changed I guess.

Are the songs more internal or external?
Stefan: I feel like they’ve stayed somewhat the same.
Liam: They go deeper, maybe. We tried to be somewhat less whiny, tried to whinge less [laughs].
Stefan: The vocal performance hasn’t improved whatsoever.
Liam: [laughs] I don’t know how it panned out though, it’s really pretty whiny.

Do the track lengths vary more this time around?
Stefan: They are all pretty short still.
Liam: There’s a couple of four minute ones… Or almost four minutes [laughs]. One’s about 3 minutes 50 seconds, but at the end of the day, it’s like 10 songs in 27-28 minutes.

 

Have you been playing the new album on the recent tours?
Liam: Yeah, we’ve been playing most of the tracks for a fair while. There’s still a couple that we don’t know how to play live because of the arrangements – trying to figure out how to make it a band song.
Stefan: Yeah, how to tune without having four guitars on stage.
Liam: [laughs] Like Wilco.
Stefan: Jet [laughs].

What’s your connection to Baro?
Stefan: We still play in his band – I play bass.
Liam: I’m on guitar.
Stefan: We recorded a couple tracks with him on the EP that he just put out.

Is it nice being able to defer to somebody else?
Liam: Yeah, it’s great [laughs].
Stefan: You just rock up, you’ve got your instrument and that’s it. It’s nice to add another genre to what we can do I guess. I think we’re going to try and make a record with him at some point, but we will see if that happens.

Have you learnt much from that type of experience?
Liam: It’s definitely helped me play the guitar better, expand the range I guess.

Some guy named Alejandro Tafurth made the ‘Warned You’ video on YouTube, did he ask you? It has 660K views
Stefan: Yes! So he sent us a message and said: “I made this video, can I put it up on the internet?” I was like “Sure!” [laughs].
Liam: Me and Joe were talking about that yesterday, people think it’s the actual video. It’s quite funny. The video is very sexual [laughs]. There’s a couple of those, where people go on skiing trips or hiking trips and they’ll make little holiday videos.
Stefan: It’s like those videos you see of like two twelve or thirteen-year-old kids hanging out with their iPhones, filming some shit. It’s just their day, hanging out.
Liam: There’s this one where some kids in America played one of our songs at their high school talent show [laughs]. It’s wild, and actually really beautiful.
Stefan: There was also a band in Japan that used our track in some sort of battle of the bands.

 

Have you guys gotten any other weird requests in your DMs?
Liam: Not exactly weird, but a lot of people ask for lyrics because we never put our lyrics online. I guess we mumble a lot, so nobody ever knows what we’re saying [laughs]. We just sort of ignore them. I think we used to send them out.
Stefan: There’s a lot of Genius.com incorrect lyrics out there [laughs].
Liam: The reissue has a poster in it with all the lyrics that we did, it’ll be interesting to see if that actually changes anything.

Have you seen what’s happened to your Spotify? There’s an album in your profile clearly not by you…
Liam: [laughs] Yeah it’s so good.
Stefan: That shit got us a lot of weird messages. People were quite confused.
Liam: There’s some great tweets actually.
Stefan: There’s a really funny one that we got this morning. A girl in South America sent us a message saying “Come play!” Then we got another message this morning and she changed her mind: “My girlfriend and I just listened to your new album, it sucks, don’t come” [laughs].
Liam: [laughs] Here’s another one: “Confused as to what the fuck you just released, did you just record some pre-made beats and just loop them?” — “I am sorry if you spent a lot of effort on the new album, but it sucks” [laughs].

What’s planned after the Europe tour?
Liam: More touring and more writing.

Have you played any festival circuits?
Liam: The only festival we’ve played was Paradise Music Festival. We did a few with Baro over summer which was funny. It’s a whole different world and pretty entertaining. The problem was we just got drunk and tried to meet semi-famous people all the time.
Stefan: Jamie T side of stage [laughs].
Liam: I don’t think we met anyone at Laneway, but we used a bunch of their resources, someone got a free massage.
Stefan: I did get a free massage! Then we just took all the free beers and went to the nearest fish and chip shop.
Liam: Cheers Laneway! [laughs].

 


 

A U S | T O U R D A T E S
Thursday 20th July – Melbourne @ The Tote w/ Dianas & Way Dynamic
Saturday 22nd July – Geelong @ The Barwon Club Hotel w/ Great Outdoors, Hachiku, Hollie Joyce & The Tiny Giants Friday 28th July – Adelaide @ The Metro w/ WORKHORSE & Goon Wizarrd
Saturday 29th July – Adelaide @ Holly Rollers w/ AVANT GARDENERS, Fair Maiden, David Blumbergs & The Maraby Band + more Friday 4th August – Coldedale @ Coledale RSL w/ Ciggie Witch, Unity Floors & Solid Effort
Saturday 5th August – Braidwood @ Braidwood Hotel w/ Ciggie Witch Sunday 6th August – Sydney @ Petersham Bowling Club w/ Ciggie Witch
Saturday 12th August – Beechworth @ Tanswell’s Commercial Hotel Friday 25th August – Castlemaine @ Petersham Bowling Club w/ Ciggie Witch
Tuesday 5th – Friday 8th September – Brisbane @ BIGSOUND

 

E U R O P E | T O U R D A T E S
Friday 15th September – Copenhagen @ Stengade Saturday 16th September – Stockholm @ Landet
Tuesday 19th September – Aarhus @ Tape Thursday 21st September – Berlin @ Internet Explorer
Friday 22nd September – Dresden @ Ostpol Saturday 23rd September – Trier @ Ex-Haus
Wednesday 27th September – Manchester @ Castle’s Thursday 28th September – London @ Shakwell Arms
Friday 29th September – Brighton @ The Joker Saturday 30th September – Paris @ Espace B

 


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