playlist

05 Apr Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (5/4/18)


Photo by Sarah Chavdaroska


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 40 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Loure, Dianas, Katie Dey, Sophiegrophy, TOMSK, RVG, MOD CON, Arthur Miles, Basic Mind, Keeskea, and this week’s best new track by Hymns.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

40. Baby Blue – ‘Fire and Ice’ | Uploaded: February 8th | Open with YouTube

39. Jarrow – ‘Wash (Off)’ | Uploaded: March 16th | Open with Bandcamp

38. Katie Dey – ‘Sad World (Coma Cinema)’ | Uploaded: March 6th | Open with SoundCloud

37. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 28th | Open with SoundCloud

36. Cable Ties – ‘Choking To Choose’ | Uploaded: March 5th | Open with YouTube

35. Liam Parsons – ‘Country/Air’ | Uploaded: February 20th | Open with SoundCloud

34. The Harpoons – ‘Pressure’ | Uploaded: March 7th | Open with SoundCloud

33. Hey Baby! – ‘Kids’ | Uploaded: March 7th | Open with SoundCloud

32. Letran – ‘Aquilaaudax’ | Uploaded: March 15th | Open with SoundCloud

31. Neon Tetra – ‘The End Begins Again’ | Uploaded: March 5th | Open with SoundCloud

30. Keeskea – ‘You Did’ | Uploaded: March 29th

29. Basic Mind – ‘Precipice’ | Uploaded: March 9th

28. Flowertruck – ‘Come Across’ | Uploaded: March 9th | Open with SoundCloud

27. Stella Donnelly – ‘Mechanical Bull’ | Uploaded: February 26th | Open with YouTube

26. Big White – ‘Right Before Everything Dies’ | Uploaded: March 12th | Open with SoundCloud

25. The Ruminaters – ‘Psychopath For You’ | Uploaded: March 14th | Open with SoundCloud

24. Tangents – ‘Arteries’ | Uploaded: March 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

23. Moody Beaches – ‘Guns’ | Uploaded: March 21st | Open with YouTube

22. Snake & Friends – ‘Men’s Shed’ | Uploaded: February 13th | Open with SoundCloud

21. Loure – ‘Smooth Talk’ | Uploaded: March 9th | Open with SoundCloud

20. Shit Bitch – ‘Royal Heady’ | Uploaded: March 18th | Open with Bandcamp

19. Arthur Miles – ‘Eastern Hymn’ | Uploaded: April 1st

18. MOD CON – ‘Kidney Auction Blues’ | Uploaded: March 28th

17. RVG – ‘Eggshell World’ | Uploaded: March 28th

16. TOMSK – ‘Cranklord’s Theme’ | Uploaded: March 29th

15. Totally Mild – ‘From One Another’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

14. Mildlife – ‘The Gloves Don’t Bite’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with YouTube

13. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with SoundCloud

12. Kwame – ‘WOW’ | Uploaded: March 24th | Open with SoundCloud

11. Good Morning – ‘Escalator’ | Uploaded: March 27th | Open with SoundCloud

10. Sophiegrophy – ‘Bag’ | Uploaded: April 2nd

9. Katie Dey – ‘Darkness’ | Uploaded: March 29th

8. Dog Futon – ‘l8 bloomr’ | Uploaded: March 24th | Open with SoundCloud

7. Dianas – ‘Leave Love’ | Uploaded: March 28th

6. Jaala – ‘Horn’ | Uploaded: March 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

5. Loure – ‘Needs’ | Uploaded: April 1st

4. Hymns – ‘Delimited’ | Uploaded: February 5th

3. Gabriella Cohen – ‘Baby’ | Uploaded: March 20th | Open with SoundCloud

2. Couture – ‘O.H.M.’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

1. Laura Jean – ‘Touchstone’ | Uploaded: March 21st | Open with Youtube


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otis

05 Apr Premiere: Otis Thomas – ‘Gina’


Photo by Kane Lehanneur


Good chance you’ve been there. Lusting for someone on the other side of the planet. Staying up all night messaging across the internet, living in “pixel dreams,” as Otis Thomas describes it.

Gina‘ is about that exact situation. In this case it’s Oliver from Otis Thomas, who is singing concerningly about his long distance relationship with Gina. Oliver “just can’t get enough” and he’s “coming apart at the seams.” There’s a good chance that between waiting online for replies from Gina, sitting at his computer with his guitar, he pieced together the outline of this song. Judging by how polished-yet-not-too-polished the track is, he worked on it over multiple online chats until “quarter to four.” That tired haziness audibly wobbles out of his throat.

If you enjoy Dick Diver‘s ability to recap a real life situation like it’s a Sunday morning chat in the backyard, under natural lighting between watering plants and drinking organic tea (feeling wholesome in other words), then welcome Otis Thomas to your share-house playlist.

Otis Thomas are playing with SOOK and SCK CHX for the SCK CHX EP launch at the Botany View on the 13th of April.

Listen to Otis Thomas’s last album Dog Dreams:


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donny

03 Apr Trading Tunes with Donny Benet


Sydney’s Donny Benet has been simmering under the radar since 2011, searching for that break out single or moment to transition him from pre-David Letterman Future Islands to post-David Letterman Future Islands. I’m not sure if that song or moment is going to come from his new album The Don, but if not then it’s still a win for Australians, because we’ll get to keep this interesting man on our shores a little longer.

The Don is out on April 6th via Dot Dash Recordings, a label underneath Remote Control Records. The album’s eight tracks contain a few of the previous catchy singles ‘Konichiwa‘ and ‘Santorini‘, and even ‘Working Out‘ that came out originally in 2016. Oddly enough one of the other pre-release singles ‘Melodie‘, didn’t make the cut.

There’s three things The Don displays really well. Firstly Donny’s ear for a hook — there’s plenty up and down the album, mostly coming in the form of a vocal hook. Secondly, the layers of glossy, sexy keyboard arpeggios, that ooze together so nicely that they make you want to hear this album properly on vinyl. The third thing is the track extensions. The shortest track on the album is 4:27 which is unusual for shiny alt-pop album, and it makes the listening experience far more rewarding. The album may only contain eight tracks, but you don’t feel short changed by the end. If you’re a fan of Neon Indian, then The Don is what you needed before summer, or it’s perfect timing if you’re about to travel north for holidays.

Word from Donny Benet:
“Any time I’ve been in a situation as a session musician and the producer is scratching their head searching for that unique sound, I’ll never hesitate to crack out my fretless bass. If the track needs some stink on it, well, say no more.
It’s an incredibly difficult instrument to play…let’s face it — any chump can play the electric bass. Take away the frets and all of a sudden you’re left with a number smaller than the Titanic survivors who can keep their head above water on this instrument.
Chances are you’ve heard one weep any time there’s a sex scene in most 80/90s Hollywood blockbusters. They’re the MSG of emotion in the musical world.
I’m a huge fan of sans frets. Here’s some of my favourite pigs.
Don
xxx”

Upcoming gigs:
Sat 7 April – The Rosemount Hotel, Perth
Sat 14 April – Howler, Melbourne
Sat 21 April – Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane
Fri 27 April – Oxford Art Factory, Sydney
Sat 28 April – Uow Uni Bar, Wollongong

Elton John – ‘Nikita’


About David Paton: “This Scotsman has played with em all – Kate Bush, Alan Parsons project and of course EJ.
Beautiful sound, just the right amount of Jaco. His performance really gives a feeling of uplifting emotion. I reckon it was a first take. A few too many fills which probably pissed off the producer and a few brown notes, but, it’s got a vibe — a keeper.”

Lou Reed – ‘My Red Joystick (live)’


About Fernando Saunders: “Check out this CV: Lou Reed, Marianne Faithfull, Joan Baez, Slash, Gavin Friday, Tori Amos, Pat Benatar, Steve Winwood, Jimmy Page, John McLaughlin, Heart, Jan Hammer, Luciano Pavarotti, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Ron Wood and Charlie Watts from The Rolling Stones, Robert Quine, Anohni, Steve Hunter, Kevin Hearn, Julieta Venegas and Suzanne Vega. Some real heat there. He’s always pushed up in the mix and really makes it work when playing with Lou. I channel this bad boy all the time.”

Japan – ‘Visions of China’


About Mick Karn: “Most bassplayers shat their pants when Jaco Pastorius came onto the scene in the ’70s. Once they cleaned up, a huge number of them then tried to play like him. So many. There’s a small number of bass players who either didn’t blink or built on what Jaco did rather than carbon copying him. Mick Karn was one of them. Some say he sounded like he did due to the incredible Wal bass that he played. He still sounded hot on a Travis Bean bass in the early Japan days. He’s just a bad boy. I also channel this man when playing. And so handsome.”

Gary Numan – ‘We Take Mystery to Bed’


About Pino Pallandino: “Young Pino. Plays a fretless Musicman Stingray, both slap and fingerstyle. You can hear the youthful enthusiasm in his playing. This track comes from the album I Assassin. The whole album is hot. Apparently Prince lost his shit hearing how Gary Numan used the LM-1 drum machine on this album. Pino played a whole bunch of stink in the 80s and cashed in on the fretless work, best known for Paul Young‘s “Wherever I lay my hat.” Came back on the scene on D’angelo’s Voodoo playing the wonky fretted P bass. Apparently likes pasta with meatballs.”

Rodriguez Jr. – ‘An Evidence Of Time (Claude VonStroke Remix)’


About Tony Levin: “Chapman stick, Funk fingers. This guys doesn’t play by anyone’s rules — and that’s hot. Probably not the 1st call guy for the sex scenes but that’s what’s great about his playing. I’m a fan.”


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dsc02428

28 Mar Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (29/3/18)


Photo by Kathleen Mary Lee


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 40 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Gabriella Cohen, Dog Futon, Good Morning, Kwame, Le Pie, Shit Bitch, Moody Beaches, Cale Sexton, Wives, Correct Line, Corin and this week’s best new track by Laura Jean.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

40. Corin – ‘Elevate’ | Uploaded: March 22nd

39. Hymns – ‘Just Another Drum Workout (Comb Filter Mix)’ | Uploaded: March 7th | Open with SoundCloud

38. Correct Line – ‘Letters To Ben Zeau’ | Uploaded: March 27th

37. Wives – ‘White Dogs’ | Uploaded: March 6th

36. Cale Sexton – ‘March01 – 3’ | Uploaded: March 19th

35. Sarah Mary Chadwick – ‘Sugar Still Melts In The Rain’ | Uploaded: March 9th | Open with SoundCloud

34. Cable Ties – ‘Tell Them Where To Go’ | Uploaded: February 28th | Open with SoundCloud

33. Love Deluxe – ‘Ivan’s Hymn’ | Uploaded: March 15th | Open with YouTube

32. Baby Blue – ‘Fire and Ice’ | Uploaded: February 8th | Open with YouTube

31. Jarrow – ‘Wash (Off)’ | Uploaded: March 16th | Open with Bandcamp

30. Katie Dey – ‘Sad World (Coma Cinema)’ | Uploaded: March 6th | Open with SoundCloud

29. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 28th | Open with SoundCloud

28. Cable Ties – ‘Choking To Choose’ | Uploaded: March 5th | Open with YouTube

27. Liam Parsons – ‘Country/Air’ | Uploaded: February 20th | Open with SoundCloud

26. The Harpoons – ‘Pressure’ | Uploaded: March 7th | Open with SoundCloud

25. Hey Baby! – ‘Kids’ | Uploaded: March 7th | Open with SoundCloud

24. Letran – ‘Aquilaaudax’ | Uploaded: March 15th | Open with SoundCloud

23. Neon Tetra – ‘The End Begins Again’ | Uploaded: March 5th | Open with SoundCloud

22. Flowertruck – ‘Come Across’ | Uploaded: March 9th | Open with SoundCloud

21. Stella Donnelly – ‘Mechanical Bull’ | Uploaded: February 26th | Open with YouTube

20. Big White – ‘Right Before Everything Dies’ | Uploaded: March 12th | Open with SoundCloud

19. The Ruminaters – ‘Psychopath For You’ | Uploaded: March 14th | Open with SoundCloud

18. Tangents – ‘Arteries’ | Uploaded: March 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

17. Moody Beaches – ‘Guns’ | Uploaded: March 21st

16. Katie Dey – ‘Data’ | Uploaded: February 4th | Open with SoundCloud

15. Snake & Friends – ‘Men’s Shed’ | Uploaded: February 13th | Open with SoundCloud

14. Loure – ‘Smooth Talk’ | Uploaded: March 9th | Open with SoundCloud

13. Shit Bitch – ‘Royal Heady’ | Uploaded: March 18th

12. Le Pie – ‘I Saw You Walking In The Street’ | Uploaded: March 27th

11. Totally Mild – ‘From One Another’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

10. Mildlife – ‘The Gloves Don’t Bite’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with YouTube

9. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with SoundCloud

8. Kwame – ‘WOW’ | Uploaded: March 24th

7. Good Morning – ‘Escalator’ | Uploaded: March 27th

6. Jaala – ‘Horn’ | Uploaded: March 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

5. Dog Futon – ‘l8 bloomr’ | Uploaded: March 24th

4. Tropical Fuck Storm – ‘You Let My Tyres Down’ | Uploaded: January 30th | Open with SoundCloud

3. Gabriella Cohen – ‘Baby’ | Uploaded: March 20th

2. Couture – ‘O.H.M.’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

1. Laura Jean – ‘Touchstone’ | Uploaded: March 21st


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Maker:L,Date:2017-9-16,Ver:5,Lens:Kan03,Act:Kan02,E-Y

25 Mar Aiming To Inspire Victorians – An Interview With By The Meadow


Words by Marcus Rimondini // Photos by Sarah Chav’ & By The Meadow Team


By The Meadow is a Music Festival set 90 minutes south-west of Melbourne in Bambra. They started in 2014 and they have slowly and carefully built up a respected fan base. This year marks their 5th festival and it’s their biggest lineup to date. In fact, I don’t believe there’s a better snapshot of 2018 Melbourne (plus a few imports) via a festival lineup. Without Paradise Music Festival or Shady Cottage this year, the spotlight is brighter on By The Meadow than ever and it sounds like they’re more than ready.

A few weeks ago we caught up Cameron and Ruby, two of the festival organisers. We discussed all the usual questions about running a small festival, but it was really their emphasis on the concept of local that made me believe this festival truly does care more about people than trying to make money or become the next big hot festival. By The Meadow wants to bring what they love about Melbourne to a region of Victoria that’s going through changes and deserves to be a part of the excitement, hoping to inspire the next generation to take part.

I was originally keen on attending based on the fantastic lineup alone, but now I just want to support the great cause that is By The Meadow. Tickets are still available if you not only feel like a good time, but want to also support our locals doing great things.

 

Marcus Rimondini: What’s the story behind how the festival started?

Ruby: Well, Cameron, for his 21st, had a festival party at his parents’ property.

Cameron: We had two 21sts in a row, mine and then my brother’s the year after and then the next year there was no birthday.

Ruby: So we were like, we just want to have a party, and my parents had a property, and so we started it there. It was really good for us to do it there, and the local community was really good.

How many people were there?

Ruby: The first year was 200…

Cameron: I think we capped it at 200, but we were pushing so many boundaries, we ended up saying “let’s just stop at 150 and it’ll be good.” Sold it in two weeks, didn’t have any permits, and just said if you want to make a donation at the gate to cover the generator *laughs*, that would be great.

Ruby: And we did cover it. The next year I thought, I don’t want my parents to lose their property because something happens, so we started getting permits, and then it started getting bigger, so we had it at my parents’ farm again. The year after (the third year), some of my very good friends’ parents’ were nice enough to let us expand on to their property, which is about 100m away over the hill.

Are they your closest neighbours?

Ruby: They’re not the closest neighbours, but it’s a lot bigger space for us, they loved the festival, and they were just like “yeah come have it at our house, we’ve got more room, more spaces for camping.

Cameron: We’ve gone from this tiny little spot. It was originally ‘by the meadow’ because it was going to be on the deck of a house, which would look out into the meadow. But we were like “ we cannot put this here,” so we put it in the meadow *laughs*. So we went from down in the bottom of this valley, where her parents house is. And now we have this site that’s right up on top of Bambra, and the view is mental. You just get this whole sweeping view of the flat plains out the back of Geelong.

Ruby: And this will be our third year (fifth overall) doing it there.

 

Was the first one in the back of a truck?

Cameron: Yeah, the first three were in the back of the same truck.

Ruby: And we had to wait until after business hours on Friday to set it up.

Cameron: It was stressful as. We had music starting at 10 am on the Saturday morning, after the trucks only shows up at 6 pm the night before… AND we had to deck the whole thing out like a professional stage.

Ruby: And then when we started doing the Friday night as well, we couldn’t get the truck in time, so now we have a proper stage.

Cameron: We now have the luxury of delivering a better package for the punters too, we can it in on a Wednesday, and then have all of Thursday and a good chunk of Friday to build something that looks really nice against the background.

Ruby: It started very DIY — and we’re trying, we’re slowly building it up *laughs*. We still like to keep it very local and what we really love, too, and lots of everyone being very involved. So hopefully we’re making it a bit cleaner, a bit more professional too.

What are some of the main things that have changed over the five years, aside from the stage?

Ruby: I think we have learnt that sometimes you need to outsource more and spend a bit more money to make it easier in the long run.

Cameron: Yeah, we’ve kind of ended up focusing on the core part that people enjoy, and then handing off a lot of the other stuff. So we’re involved in making sure that the lineup is amazing, and the sound that delivers the lineup to the punters is as good as we can get. We’ve been so lucky, the sound guys we started with have been phenomenal, they’re audio nerds, they’re amazing. We work pretty close with the food, we think that’s a pretty core part as to why people dig festivals. We try to keep it local as well.

Ruby: Really local, so it has been one of our very good friends for the first couple of years.

Cameron: So we’ve had a chef from back home in Colac, we get him to pick a pop-up menu for the weekend. The food’s important, making sure all that stuff is consistent.

Ruby: We want to make sure it’s good food, but not super expensive. We’re really lucky, Cameron has a motorbike shop, so he has access to a lot of things that we need. My dad and my brothers are builders, without them — at the start especially — we wouldn’t have been able to do it.

So you get the whole family to help out?

Ruby: We get my brother’s friends, and Cameron’s brother’s friends come down.

Cameron: They’ll be there for like six or so days. They’ll work hard a couple days before, then enjoy the festival, and then on a Sunday morning when they’re feeling like dirtbags, they’ll be the ones working the hardest.

Ruby: They’re very good, they put up with a lot, but they have a very good time at it as well.

Cameron: That stuff all around the outside has changed, but what we deliver in the middle is identical. We just try to take a really tidy snapshot of what’s up and coming in music around here (northside Melbourne).

 

Was there anything in particular you were looking to mix up this year with the lineup?

Cameron: I guess we need to talk about gender equality on the bill. We’re super conscious of it now. We always tried to cater towards gender equality, and I think we managed to do so pretty well from the outset like we had Ali Barter headlining four years ago. Now that there are people specifically going out and pointing out the percentage of females in your lineup, it really makes a good point. And when you see a lot of festivals that don’t, you think, you’ve got to do something about it. There’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to, given where we are and what we have access to. So we’re extremely conscious of trying to book an equal lineup and I think this year we have over 50% bands with female members in them, we’re pretty happy with that. But it is difficult to do so still; it takes way more work, and it would be far easier to ignore, but that’s a big part of what we set out to do this year.

Do you feel the genres are a little more varied?

Ruby: Yeah, I guess we like to put bands on that we’re going to have fun listening to, mostly.

Cameron: We’ll spend a lot of time going out and seeing these bands.

Ruby: We’re there working, but we want to hear it and be having a good time, and see people having a good time.

Cameron: So if it’s varied, it’s just an indication of what we’ve been listening to in the last 12 to 18 months. But it doesn’t feel that much more varied, I think there’s less hip-hop than we’ve had in the past.

Ruby: This is off the record, but I love hip-hop! So that’s a real disappointment to me.

Cameron: We normally tried to get two or three, but this year we’ve just got HTMLFlowers, 30/70 is I guess a little bit swinging towards hip-hop, but we definitely don’t have as much clear cut hip-hop on the bill this year as normal. There really is no picture, we’ll go out targeting some big acts to head the bill, and then fill in below, as to where we need to find the diversity. If we have heaps of rock bands, we’ll find pop bands and electronic music..”

Ruby: It’s nearly a bit selfish because it’s all just bands we love to listen to, but we think other people will enjoy it as well.

Cameron: It also has to represent either somebody who has put out a debut album that’s doing really well, or somebody that’s emerging and showing such clear talent that they’re going to go somewhere. There are not many bands on our bill that have been just punching around in the middle of the music scene for a long time.

Ruby: What I really like about Meadow is that a lot of it’s done by word-of-mouth, by people who have been before and then their friends come and they’re like, “this is amazing!” Or you go out to a bar and someone’s wearing a By The Meadow t-shirt and they’re talking about how good it was. It’s really nice to hear that, we don’t do that much advertising.

Cameron: We shut it down (during the year).

Ruby: We want to maintain the vibe of people being friendly to each other, we don’t want to cater to a completely different audience. The people who come are amazing people. You want their friends, and the people they would be with to come as well.

Did you have any issues leading up to this festival?

Cameron: This one’s been as smooth as anything. Early on we had some sound pollution issues with neighbours, but you work through those, and you try and build some relationships with those neighbours.

Ruby: It was funny because some of the biggest issues were with neighbours who actually came from Melbourne and had a holiday home.

Cameron: We’ve had nothing this year.

Ruby: Or last year.

Cameron: The hardest things would’ve been in just the band booking. Last year I was away through October, November and start of December in Detroit. That was difficult trying to book a bill from the other side of the world, because it would be like one email a day, if they came back with a bad answer, I’d be like “shit I’ve wasted another day.” I underestimated how hard it would be to converse back and forth. So the bill came out a bit later than we hoped, but that was it, we got there in the end.

 

What are some of the highlights of the previous years?

Cameron: One of the best ones for me was when I was at the urinal, and this bloke pulled up next to me and he’s like “you run this thing don’t you, you’re one of the ones who runs it, this is great, it’s like a house, but outside and not at a house.” It was like the best thing to hear. This guy was clearly wrecked, but I was like “oh my god, he’s so wise.”

So why the weekend after Easter?

Ruby: It’s a weird time of the year, because you’ve probably just gone to Golden Plains and then pay three weeks later to go to another festival. It’s necessary for us, because of the area we’re in, it has to be out of total fire ban season. We couldn’t do it any earlier than when we do it.

Cameron: Yeah, I don’t how Easter works, but it moves a lot *laughs*. It like follows a full moon or something. We pushed last year forward, because Easter was late April. We just get guided by the first weekend of April, otherwise we try to go the weekend after Easter. Because we’re all working, so we all need that time off over Easter to go and set it up. Last year was hard, because we were all trying to get time off work the week before to go and do it. The idea at first was to go the opposite time of the year to Paradise Music Festival.

Does the timing of the festival worry you financially?

Ruby: We’re really careful with what we spend money on.

Cameron: It would be so easy to go out and spend so much money on a bill, and make an amazing bill and still not get that audience down there. This year was the biggest step we’ve ever taken. But we’ll end in the same position again, net zero, everyone’s had a good time, and we’ll be like “thank god we didn’t lose any money!” You learn so much, and you just make so many connections and meet so many people, you won’t get that from going to gigs or being in a band or whatever, you just don’t learn the same stuff.

How’s the weather in April?

Ruby: Well ours was a little bit colder than usual last year; it wasn’t super cold, but it was colder. I actually noticed a drop in the visits to the first aid tent for people who got thorns in their feet and stuff — everyone was wearing shoes, which is alright!

Where do you source your artists from?

Cameron: We start booking kind of around BIGSOUND time, which is a good indicator of what’s going to go well, but you have to be careful, too. There’s also Melbourne Music Week. We source from everywhere, if you went to one source only, you wouldn’t get a very good picture of what’s happening right now.

Have you tried to reach a crowd that’s outside of the Melbourne bubble?

Cameron: We advertised for the first time, because I truly believe there’s got to be a bunch of kids in that Torquay area, there’s got to be a massive audience down there of this young population, even young families. But maybe we’re too early, and they’re going to have kids, and their kids are going to be ready for festivals. There’s just this massive population boom in and around Torquay and that side of Geelong.

Ruby: I think it’s getting them there in the first place. This isn’t meaning to speak bad of the country people, because I’m from there, but a lot of the bands we’re having are well-known in Melbourne, but not so well-known in country areas. Once people come though, they tend to come back, again and again, it’s a lot to do with them loving the music.

Cameron: I think there will be more people from that area eventually engaging with it. I think Geelong is coming up again, there are a few music venues popping up there now. Better bands are touring out there. Ten years ago they had really good music culture coming out of Geelong, it’s where like King Gizzard and The Murlocs started out. Then it died and all the cool pubs that bands played at, closed. It’s coming back, Workers Club is helping. So here’s hoping there will be more of an audience, because that’s 20 minutes from us, half an hour from Bambra.

What are some of the things about running a festival that are much harder than you expected?

Cameron: We didn’t have any experience. We went to the council and were like “how do you run an event?” like “what do we legally have to do to run this?” Then she started calling in police officers and CFA people to talk to us. We were like 21, and the police officer was like “what are you going to do when somebody dies of a drug overdose?” It was just frustrating being talked down to, we were trying to do the right thing.

Ruby: It’s a weird situation especially with drug talk, a lot of people said “what are you going to do to prevent this?” Well we’re trying to promote a culture where it’s not encouraged, and at the same time we’re going to have everything available in the event that something does happen. Originally they wanted us to put security cameras on every tree. This is when we had 400 people coming to the festival, we couldn’t even afford lights for the campground.

Cam: They were the biggest hurdles, and now that they know we’ve got the ability to run it, we’ve kept people safe for five years in a row down there. That hurdle kind of disappeared.

 

If you had more money, what would you do to the festival?

Cameron: I wouldn’t change much to be honest.

Ruby: We would probably hire people to do all the work that our dads do, so they wouldn’t have to do it.

Cameron: That’s actually a good one *laughs*. But it wouldn’t matter, they would find something else. If I get somebody else to do the things dad will do, dad will find something else that needs doing, it doesn’t matter if there’s nothing left to do. He will find something.

Ruby: They do love it, though.

Cameron: We’re nearly where we need to be for it to run successfully, and to give us the opportunity to do it again next year. We’re pretty happy. We love the way that it’s forced upon anyone, it’s not on giant billboards or anything. I don’t know if you got the press release, but we get our beers from the guys down the road, our wines from a local winery, our food from our friends in now Lorne, one from Aireys Inlet, and one from Colac. We’re pretty passionate about keeping that stuff strictly local, and deliberately steering clear of food trucks. So there will not be a food truck at our festival.

Ruby: Our stage comes from Winchelsea primary school, which is a primary school about ten minutes away, we have a guy from Colac who brings us a truck full of ice, our sound guys come from Geelong, and the coffee comes from Apollo Bay. Everything we can do, we try and keep really local!


 


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22 Mar Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (22/3/18)


Photo by Gina Cawley


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 40 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Loure, Tangents, The Ruminaters, Big White, Flowertruck, Neon Tetra, Letran, Hey Baby!, The Harpoons, Jarrow, Allume, Love Deluxe, Hymns, Em Burrows, Cable Ties, Going Swimming, Demon Days, Sarah Mary Chadwick, TV Haze, HTMLflowers, Courtney Barnett, Tiny Giants, HVNCOQ, Lehmann B. Smith, Your Girl Pho, and this week’s best new track by Tropical Fuck Storm.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

40. Your Girl Pho – ‘Feelen’ | Uploaded: March 9th

39. Lehmann B. Smith – ‘Thus Must Rust’ | Uploaded: March 14th

38. HVNCOQ – ‘Unusual’ | Uploaded: March 12th

37. Tiny Giants – ‘Sink Swim’ | Uploaded: March 16th

36. Courtney Barnett – ‘Need A Little Time’ | Uploaded: March 15th

35. HTMLflowers ft. Eilish Gilligan – ‘Spirit Double’ | Uploaded: March 7th

34. TV Haze – ‘Sunny Side Up’ | Uploaded: March 20th

33. Sarah Mary Chadwick – ‘Sugar Still Melts In The Rain’ | Uploaded: March 9th

32. Demon Days – ‘No Winners’ | Uploaded: March 14th

31. Going Swimming – ‘True Lady of Leisure’ | Uploaded: March 12th

30. Cable Ties – ‘Tell Them Where To Go’ | Uploaded: February 28th

29. Em Burrows – ‘Boy’ | Uploaded: March 16th

28. Hymns – ‘Just Another Drum Workout (Comb Filter Mix)’ | Uploaded: March 7th

27. Love Deluxe – ‘Ivan’s Hymn’ | Uploaded: March 15th

26. Allume – ‘Some Kind Of Blessing’ | Uploaded: March 15th

25. Baby Blue – ‘Fire and Ice’ | Uploaded: February 8th | Open with YouTube

24. Jarrow – ‘Wash (Off)’ | Uploaded: March 16th

23. Katie Dey – ‘Sad World (Coma Cinema)’ | Uploaded: March 6th | Open with SoundCloud

22. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 28th | Open with SoundCloud

21. Nai Palm – ‘Homebody’ | Uploaded: January 24th | Open with YouTube

20. Cable Ties – ‘Choking To Choose’ | Uploaded: March 5th | Open with YouTube

19. Liam Parsons – ‘Country/Air’ | Uploaded: February 20th | Open with SoundCloud

18. The Harpoons – ‘Pressure’ | Uploaded: March 7th

17. Hey Baby! – ‘Kids’ | Uploaded: March 7th

16. Letran – ‘Aquilaaudax’ | Uploaded: March 15th

15. Neon Tetra – ‘The End Begins Again’ | Uploaded: March 5th

14. Flowertruck – ‘Come Across’ | Uploaded: March 9th

13. Stella Donnelly – ‘Mechanical Bull’ | Uploaded: February 26th | Open with YouTube

12. Big White – ‘Right Before Everything Dies’ | Uploaded: March 12th

11. The Ruminaters – ‘Psychopath For You’ | Uploaded: March 14th

10. Tangents – ‘Arteries’ | Uploaded: March 2nd

9. Katie Dey – ‘Data’ | Uploaded: February 4th | Open with SoundCloud

8. Snake & Friends – ‘Men’s Shed’ | Uploaded: February 13th | Open with SoundCloud

7. Loure – ‘Smooth Talk’ | Uploaded: March 9th

6. Totally Mild – ‘From One Another’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

5. Mildlife – ‘The Gloves Don’t Bite’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with YouTube

4. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with SoundCloud

3. Jaala – ‘Horn’ | Uploaded: March 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

2. Tropical Fuck Storm – ‘You Let My Tyres Down’ | Uploaded: January 30th

1. Couture – ‘O.H.M.’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube


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07 Mar Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (8/3/18)


Photo by Sarah Chavdaroska


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 40 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Cable Ties, Katie Dey, Loure, Middle Management, Ben Houghton, Golden Syrup, Gena Bruce, No Mono, Tetrahedra, Montero, Annie Bass & Christopher Port, and this week’s best new track by Jaala.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

40. Annie Bass & Christopher Port – ‘Thrown Away’ | Uploaded: March 2nd

39. Montero – ‘Pilot’ | Uploaded: February 9th

38. Tetrahedra – ‘Klein’ | Uploaded: February 14th

37. No Mono – ‘Tidal Fight’ | Uploaded: February 27th

36. Gena Bruce – ‘The Way You Make Love’ | Uploaded: March 2nd

35. Golden Syrup – ‘Explore’ | Uploaded: March 1st

34. Camp Cope – ‘How To Socialise & Make Friends’ | Uploaded: January 30th | Open with YouTube

33. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Mainland’ | Uploaded: January 22nd | Open with YouTube

32. Arthur Miles – ‘DHN (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 7th | Open with SoundCloud

31. The Ancients – ‘Frozen Aisle’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with SoundCloud

30. Chiara Kickdrum – ‘Moebius’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

29. Darcy Baylis – ‘The Taste of Cherry 🍒’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with SoundCloud

28. MOD CON – ‘Neighbourhood’ | Uploaded: February 10th | Open with YouTube

27. Curves – ‘Marcel’s Booth’ | Uploaded: February 14th | Open with SoundCloud

26. Tetrahedra – ‘I Wouldn’t Mind’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

25. Fantastic Man – ‘The Times We Loved To Miss’ | Uploaded: January 12th | Open with SoundCloud

24. Tram Cops – ‘Even In My Dreams’ | Uploaded: February 19th | Open with SoundCloud

23. Clarissa Mei – ‘Vulnerable’ | Uploaded: February 16th | Open with SoundCloud

22. Ben Houghton – ‘Don’t Worry’ | Uploaded: February 9th

21. Bōnewoman – ‘ACTIV8’ | Uploaded: January 28th | Open with SoundCloud

20. Middle Management – ‘Return’ | Uploaded: February 20th

19. Courtney Barnett – ‘Nameless, Faceless’ | Uploaded: February 15th | Open with YouTube

18. Mio – ‘Happy New Year XD’ | Uploaded: February 10th | Open with SoundCloud

17. Sui Zhen – ‘No More Words’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

16. Loure – ‘Mutual Motion’ | Uploaded: March 6th

15. Baby Blue – ‘Fire and Ice’ | Uploaded: February 8th | Open with YouTube

14. Katie Dey – ‘Sad World (Coma Cinema)’ | Uploaded: March 6th

13. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 28th | Open with SoundCloud

12. Nai Palm – ‘Homebody’ | Uploaded: January 24th | Open with YouTube

11. Cable Ties – ‘Choking To Choose’ | Uploaded: March 5th

10. Oscar Key Sung – ‘D.Y.T.’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with YouTube

9. Liam Parsons – ‘Country/Air’ | Uploaded: February 20th | Open with SoundCloud

8. Stella Donnelly – ‘Mechanical Bull’ | Uploaded: February 26th | Open with YouTube

7. Katie Dey – ‘Data’ | Uploaded: February 4th | Open with SoundCloud

6. Snake & Friends – ‘Men’s Shed’ | Uploaded: February 13th | Open with SoundCloud

5. Totally Mild – ‘From One Another’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube

4. Mildlife – ‘The Gloves Don’t Bite’ | Uploaded: February 22nd | Open with YouTube

3. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with SoundCloud

2. Jaala – ‘Horn’ | Uploaded: March 2nd

1. Couture – ‘O.H.M.’ | Uploaded: February 27th | Open with YouTube


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28 Feb Ripe Guide: Australia’s Best New Music (1/3/18)


Photo by Gina Cawley


This is our updated weekly playlist of the 50 best new Australian songs released within the past two months. This week’s guide includes new entries from Amaya Laucirica, Mildlife, Totally Mild, Snake & Friends, Stella Donnelly, Liam Parsons, Oscar Key Sung, Arthur Miles, Baby Blue, Mio, Courtney Barnett, Clarissa Mei, Tram Cops, Curves, MOD CON, Darcy Baylis, The Ancients, Donny Benet, Planète, Borneo, Hachiku, Primitive Motion, The Jim Mitchells, Rebel Yell, Lowtide, Cop Envy, Straight Arrows, River Yarra + Tom Baker, Flowertruck, Lee Hannah, Cabu, Horror My Friend, Kid Fiction, Dog Futon, Nice Biscuit, Dave O’Connor, Pussy In The Dark, and this week’s best new track by Couture.

As always, we have an updated Spotify playlist, updated SoundCloud playlist, and our full guide below.

spotifysoundcloud

50. Pussy In The Dark – ‘Stones’ | Uploaded: February 12th

49. Dave O’Connor – ‘Your Strength’ | Uploaded: February 12th

48. Nice Biscuit – ‘Captain’ | Uploaded: February 23rd

47. Dog Futon – ‘Personal Trainer Sans Frontieres’ | Uploaded: February 14th

46. Kid Fiction – ‘Silence Is Golden’ | Uploaded: February 14th

45. Dasler – ‘Forever’ | Uploaded: January 26th | Open with SoundCloud

44. Horror My Friend – ‘Pavement’ | Uploaded: February 13th

43. Albrecht La’Brooy – ‘Sealers Cove’ | Uploaded: February 2nd | Open with SoundCloud

42. Cabu ft. Akacia – ‘Good’ | Uploaded: February 25th

41. Lee Hannah – ‘Infinitely’ | Uploaded: February 7th

40. Flowertruck – ‘Enough For Now’ | Uploaded: February 5th

39. River Yarra + Tom Baker – ‘Babylonia’ | Uploaded: February 10th

38. Straight Arrows – ‘Out And Down’ | Uploaded: February 10th

37. Dormir – ‘In Pursuit (Cop Envy Remix)’ | Uploaded: February 2nd

36. Lowtide – ‘Southern Mind’ | Uploaded: February 12th

35. Rebel Yell – ‘Pressure Drop’ | Uploaded: February 15th

34. The Jim Mitchells – ‘(Let Them All In)’ | Uploaded: February 12th

33. Primitive Motion – ‘Small Orbit’ | Uploaded: February 15th

32. Hachiku – ‘Murray’s Lullaby’ | Uploaded: February 22nd

31. Borneo – ‘Jesse’ | Uploaded: February 9th

30. Planète – ‘Alone In Parallel’ | Uploaded: February 14th

29. Donny Benet – ‘Santorini’ | Uploaded: February 14th

28. Camp Cope – ‘How To Socialise & Make Friends’ | Uploaded: January 30th | Open with YouTube

27. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – ‘Mainland’ | Uploaded: January 22nd | Open with YouTube

26. Arthur Miles – ‘DHN (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 7th | Open with SoundCloud

25. The Ancients – ‘Frozen Aisle’ | Uploaded: February 22nd

24. Chiara Kickdrum – ‘Moebius’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

23. Darcy Baylis – ‘The Taste of Cherry 🍒’ | Uploaded: February 27th

22. MOD CON – ‘Neighbourhood’ | Uploaded: February 10th

21. Curves – ‘Marcel’s Booth’ | Uploaded: February 14th

20. Tetrahedra – ‘I Wouldn’t Mind’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

19. Fantastic Man – ‘The Times We Loved To Miss’ | Uploaded: January 12th | Open with SoundCloud

18. Tram Cops – ‘Even In My Dreams’ | Uploaded: February 19th

17. Clarissa Mei – ‘Vulnerable’ | Uploaded: February 16th

16. Bōnewoman – ‘ACTIV8’ | Uploaded: January 28th | Open with SoundCloud

15. Courtney Barnett – ‘Nameless, Faceless’ | Uploaded: February 15th

14. Mio – ‘Happy New Year XD’ | Uploaded: February 10th

13. Sui Zhen – ‘No More Words’ | Uploaded: February 6th | Open with SoundCloud

12. Baby Blue – ‘Fire and Ice’ | Uploaded: February 8th

11. Arthur Miles – ‘Deep Bit (Demo)’ | Uploaded: February 28th

10. Nai Palm – ‘Homebody’ | Uploaded: January 24th | Open with YouTube

9. Oscar Key Sung – ‘D.Y.T.’ | Uploaded: February 22nd

8. Liam Parsons – ‘Country/Air’ | Uploaded: February 20th

7. Stella Donnelly – ‘Mechanical Bull’ | Uploaded: February 26th

6. Katie Dey – ‘Data’ | Uploaded: February 4th | Open with SoundCloud

5. Snake & Friends – ‘Men’s Shed’ | Uploaded: February 13th

4. Totally Mild – ‘From One Another’ | Uploaded: February 27th

3. Mildlife – ‘The Gloves Don’t Bite’ | Uploaded: February 22nd

2. Amaya Laucirica – ‘Could This Be’ | Uploaded: February 27th

1. Couture – ‘O.H.M.’ | Uploaded: February 27th


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14 Feb Premiere: Curves – ‘Marcel’s Booth’


The Melbourne existential-neon five piece Curves have kindly given us the honour of premiering their latest song ‘Marcel’s Booth‘, the second single since their 2016 All Made Up EP.

If Total Giovanni is Melbourne’s modern version of Talking Heads, then Curves are Melbourne’s modern Depeche Mode. Curve’s ties to new-wave extend beyond the layers of deep synth sounds to the visual on early ’80’s MTV music videos. Singer Patrick Mooney comes from the film world, which plays an important role in Curves’ music. Every lyric reads like a script, from “Dancing alone in a New York Apartment” to “And everyone’s having fun.

Curves transcend you to an alternative universe where new-wave revivalists James Pants and Twin Shadow are the world’s biggest stars. Everything is a little warped, the sounds suck you in and out. Even the track title was originally ‘Marcel’s Diner’ not ‘Marcel’s Booth’, so you know exactly where they are, but if you’ve seen Twin Peaks you know that weird unusual things happen in diner booths.

Even the timing of releasing the song on Valentine’s Day adds to the romantic intimate experience, a feeling you can really only get from a movie.

Curves are expected to perform regularly around Melbourne this year and release their second EP, too.

Watch Curves live in the Ripe office back in December 2017.



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09 Feb Trading Tunes with Daydreams


The wizard trio behind the fantastic Daydreams parties are DJing at By The Meadow festival between the 6th-8th of April. The line-up is already stacked with awesome live bands throughout a variety of genres, and so having the Daydreams DJs spin tunes in the night is the perfect cherry on top.

There’s only 700 tickets remaining, so you know By The meadow will sell out soon. Especially once you hear Daydreams’ selections for their Trading Tunes feature. The theme is “a bunch of tracks from the 80s, plus a new one from a guy we love that also loves the 80s.”

By The Meadows Line-Up – Click Here for Tickets!

 

Rainbow Team – ‘Dreaming’


“Daydreams, dur.”

J.C. Barreto – ‘Dr. Love’


“Absolute funk/boogie bomb.”

Taboo – ‘Self Service (Give me some sugar give me banana)’


“So much amazing stuff from South Africa in the 80s – hard to just choose one, to be honest.”

Jex Opolis – ‘Infinity Room’


“A track off Human Emotion, Jexy’s new record on his own label, Good Timin’. Love you, Jexy.”

Hamid El Shaeri – ‘Ayonha’


“Off a compilation of songs from the Arabic world in the 70s and 80s. Habibi Funk, check it out.”


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